Around Akron with Blue Green: January 2020

Around Akron with Blue Green: January 2020


(upbeat music)– Hey out there, Akronites.Welcome once again to Around
Akron with Blue Green.
And I want to thank
you for joining me here
in my den of Akron, where
I read, where I research
and plan out future episodesof Around Akron with Blue Green.But enough about that, this
episode is an amazing episode.
We’re gonna visit some
really neat people.
I’m gonna head over to
the CNC Training Center
and learn all about
this amazing school,
where they teach you to
make just about anything
from a blueprint and a
machine that you program.
I’m gonna head down
to Blueberry Hill
to meet up with
the Grizzled Wizard
of Waste Not Want
Not, P.R. Miller,
and see what he’s been up to.I meet up with Jared
Lees and talk all about
his custom-made knives.Now this is an amazing segment
you’re gonna want to see.
Now to kick this show off today,we’re gonna meet
up with Scott Fox
and talk about his 30
years of working at ACME,
what he does there,
and his up and coming
photography book.Let’s go see what
Scott Fox is all about.
– Like 10-years-old and I gotone of the throwaway cameras.Pictures don’t turn out
the way I wanted it to
so I had to go back and
get a better camera.
That’s when the digital
cameras came along
I decided to go that route.And I was down at the Stuff
Emporium, I saw their camera,
they had a Nokia but they
wanted too much for that
so I went all the way
down to down at the
Bomb Shelter, they
had one I wanted.
One that looked
almost like something
Paul McCartney had but
I couldn’t get that one,
it was not for sale,
that’s for look.
Then he had, I saw a $9
one so I got that camera.
That’s the digital
camera, it’s digital film,
you can film and all that
but you’ve got to have
the right film cartridge for it.(relaxed music)“Journey into a Writer
& Photographer’s Mind”,
that’s what I
named the new book.
It looks like I’m standing
there at that treehouse
when I had my sister-in-law
take that picture for me
with my cameras and then I dideverything else to the picture.It looks like somebody stalking,it’s like you up there
stalking me (chuckling).
I had to do that,
everybody said oh look,
there’s somebody stalking you.I said, yeah,
somebody’s coming down,
they’re showing off
the tour and come down
and I didn’t realize I was
gettin’ pictures taken.
That’s the one
that I didn’t take
so I can’t claim that one.(relaxed music)My caseworker talked
to my brothers,
everybody I got a
surprise for Scott,
let’s interview him.He’s been there for 30
years, we want to get that
in the can so we went
to Starbucks to do that.
My brothers signed
papers and said
we’re okay with that,
we’ll do anything you need
him to do but call his
boss and let him know
we’re coming in to take photos.We can come in 10 minutes
earlier than I need to
and we can do a
photo shoot that way.
I thought I like that idea.I’m showing a side that
people don’t know about me.
If you go to Akron
Live, it’s inside
the advertisement for
October and it stays
until the November
issue and billboard.
I got 5000 followers
because of that.
(upbeat music)I do packing groceries,
I do sometimes
if they need stocking
I will put things back
up on the shelf and
that and I clean up,
things like that.I like doing packing
because packing
you get to meet
people, talk to people.
When you carry out,
they’re like hey,
how’s work going for you?I heard you’re gonna
do this and that.
I’m like oh yeah,
you heard that.
Yeah, can we be
friends on Facebook
since you made that billboard?Yes, you can.They ask me when
I’m gonna retire.
I said, don’t know yet.I’m too young at 48-years-old,can’t retire at that age.Employees, customers,
friends, rock stars
they even recognize me,
when are you gonna retire?
Can’t retire just yet,
not time to retire yet.
If I could I would, you know.Someday, if my photograph
book does well,
I want to put a book togetherwhere there’s a story
behind the man, that’s me.
(upbeat music)If you’re taking
photographs, keep on trying
until you get what you need.If you don’t like
what you’ve done,
if the person you
took the picture of
didn’t like the way it was done,have them sit with you and
talk what you want to do
on that photo, how
they want it done.
I’m on Facebook,
I’m on this and that
and people say oh,
it’s just a hobby.
I say no, it’s not
a hobby for me,
it’s actually what I want to do.So I’ve worked for
a grocery store,
I want to be a photographer.Get photographed
showing people my work
for what I can do out and about.Never done that
before, I say it’s time
to get into photographing.– Next up is the
CNC Training Center.
I’m gonna sit down and learn
all about their school.
It’s a short program, it doesn’t
cost a whole lot of money
and there’s a 95%
chance you’re gonna get
a good-paying job once you
get done with the program.
Let’s go see what the
CNC Training Center
is all about.– [Laurie] I actually
really enjoy my job because
I know the outcome
that’s waiting for them,
even if they don’t believe
it when they first come in.
But I’ve seen it so many
times over 13 years,
the outcomes of students
and the jobs that they get,
that I want to transfer
that enthusiasm to them
during their four months.And then when they
actually get their job
and their new career path,
nothing feels better for me
than to know that I
had a part in them
who made a commitment to
be able to make a living
the rest of their life and
take care of their family.
So none of the people
get to do that.
The program is a four-month
program and the students
will learn hands-on machinery.So they’re learn a C & C
mill and a C & C lathe,
they’ll learn to operate it.And then we have a
classroom with computers
where we teach
related materials,
such as math, blueprint
reading, but we also
teach them to
program the machines
because they are programmed
by a computer language,
which we teach them.– [James] I think that the
young people need to know today
about this business, it’s not
like maybe they’ve read about
or heard about from the
past where it was like
these dirty, dingy factories.Places are clean, the
equipment’s clean.
It’s a really much
cleaner environment
and much safer environment
than it used to be.
Years ago, we didn’t have
all the safety precautions
that we have now.The machines today, you can’t
even open the door on ’em
while they’re runnin’,
they’ve got lockouts on ’em.
It’s really, really
gettin’ to be high tech
and if they want to get
themselves involved in it,
get into the
programming end of it,
and working with the
computers all the time,
it’s very rewarding.And what I’ve
always liked is it’s
extremely rewarding when
you take a piece of paper
that’s got something
drawn on it and you make
that finished product
and you’ve got something
that you can look at
that you actually did
and it’s very satisfying.(high key music)– There’s actually 1100
machining companies
within an hour radius
of the City of Akron
and those companies
are very busy
and their number one problem isa lack of skilled workers.So we’re trying to meet
the needs of companies
to provide employees
but we’re additionally
trying to meet the
needs of the students
who want long-term employment
once they’re done training.
– It’s just a wide variety
in what we call a job shop.
We don’t have a specific
product line that we make,
we make stuff for everybody.And the variety is really nice
’cause you don’t get bored,
it’s just changing all the time.You may run five
little pieces tomorrow
and the day after that
you’ll have 100 something
totally different and it
just keeps you on your toes.
– We can make anything
from pieces and parts
for airplanes, boats,
pins for brakes.
I mean, just imagine making
a pin for an airplane
that goes into the brakes
that stops the plane.
I want them to be just
right (chuckling).
We make stuff like that.We make pretty much
anything that you see
that’s made out of metal
we pretty much make.
All my jobs have really
been in job shops
so it’s not really a production
where you’re just making
thousands and thousands
of the same part.
Pretty much stuff we do,where companies have
a hard time doing it,
they send it to us for us
to brainstorm a way to do it
and make the parts for ’em.We do screws, bolts,
rotors, all kind of,
we do pretty much anything
that’s made out of metal
we pretty much, machine.And I’m talkin’ even
pieces for our machines,
when they break, we pretty
much make those parts
and put the machines
back together.
So it’s a busy job (chuckling).(guitar music)You try to figure out anything.Anything I see, I try to
figure out a way to machine it,
whether I’m at Walmart,
Sav-a-Lot, it don’t matter.
I’m always looking to see not
only how I will machine it
but the best way
I would machine it
and what material I would
use and speeds, feeds.
It’s a constant
thinking thing so yeah,
I look at the
schematics of anything
and think about how
I can put it together
and that makes it
exciting for me.
– The type of person that
wants to do this for a living
is generally a
busy, active doer.
Yes, you are going
to operate machinery
and so you have to enjoy
the hands-on component.
You don’t, interestingly, have
to be mechanically-inclined
because we’re not fixing the
machines in our industry,
we’re actually making something.So you have to take
pride in the fact
that you started with maybe
a plain piece of steel
and a blueprint and then
you created something
that could be in a jet
or the military or a car.
So you have to take
pride in your work
and the precision of it.It can appeal to a lot of
different personalities
but they definitely have to bea busy, active doer and
many of them obviously
want to become promoted
and own companies
and become foremen, inspectors,computer programmers full-time
so there’s other jobs
they can get down the road.– And I think anybody
that gets into it
and really applies themselves,it’s unlimited how
far you can go.
– I take a trip down
to Blueberry Hill
to visit the Grizzled Wizard
of Waste Not Want Not,
P.R. Miller.I visit the junkman,
artist, and wizard
and see what this
guy is all about.
– Destiny, what am I doing
here and why a I living?
Do I have a purpose
in life and basically,
how did I get into this
mess to begin with?
Destiny, everyone has one
but way too many people
never question it.They never question anything.They just go about
their daily grind
of doing what
they’re told to do,
when they’re told to do,pursuing the in God we trust,
American almighty dollar.
They’re called Muggles.They come in all
shapes, sizes, colors,
inclinations, and ages.They are everywhere.They are deluded,
they are dangerous,
they are dumb.And if they don’t wake up soon,we are all doomed.(ominous music)I have three identifies.I’m a junkman, my
job is to recycle.
I’m an artist, my job is to
alter the viewer’s reality.
And I am a wizard and
my function as a wizard
is to observe the flow
of energy and direct it
to its proper place, be
it the light or the dark
to the best of my
capacities and capabilities.
Several years ago
several momentous things
happened to me as a result
of being prosecuted.
Number one, a movie
was made about me
by a guy named Josh Gippin,“The Grizzled Wizard
of Waste Not Want Not”.
So that was earth changing
if for no other reason
that it brought
me into publicity
and that a direct result
of that particular movie
was that the Akron Public
Library commissioned me
to do the frog in front of the
library in Highland Square.
So that was kind of
earth changing because
people are like wait a
minute, this guy’s a junkman.
How can he be an artist?Well I am both and I might
add, very proudly so.
(ominous music)I was named the
Artist-in-Residence
of Stan Hewitt right after
the prosecution ended
and all the alleged junk went
to Stan Hewitt for a year.
I had 125 of my giant flowers
all over Stan Hewitt’s garden.
Since then I’ve been
the Artist-in-Residence
at Walsh University,
Mount Union College,
Cleveland Botanical Gardens.And about 10 years ago
I got an opportunity
to move to Loudonville
to 175-acre farm
called Blueberry Hill.We have 15 acres of organic,
pick-your-own blueberries
and it is quite tranquil here.Quite different than living
on an ambulance route
in Akron and constantly
the police are going by
and all this other garbage.So I’m at the point
now where the farm
is pretty well put
together and I am
very seriously contemplating
how to re-enter
the art scene in Akron.(miraculous music)I’ve been doing this all my lifebecause I grew up in a junkyard.As a child the town
dump was my playground.
And because we didn’t
have any money,
it was you make due
with whatever you have.
And mother was very much
into use your imagination
because basically
your imagination
is the most important thing
that you shall ever have
because it is your
map to your future.
So I’ve always taken things
that people throw away
and say gee, that
looks like a flower
or that looks like
a part of a bug
or those are wings
or whatever it is.
So my whole life
has just evolved.
One could say quite
factually that I have
72 years of experience
in recycling
before it was called recycling,that’s a modern term.(miraculous music)It is all a question of
exploring the unknown
through the use of
your imagination.
The imagination is the
most important thing
that you will ever have
because it is your map
to your future,
including tomorrow.
When Josh did this
movie and the director
of the library hey, we
need you to do a piece
and right beside you
there is a picture
of the frog in front of the
Highland Square Library.
I still consider
that to be probably
the best piece I’ve ever done.So and it was also
the last major piece
I did before I left Akron.Now that I’m down here, I’m
also slowly getting back
into metal.I did a 20-foot tall
set of flowers out here
at the driveway.Gotta bug that is across
the driveway there
that’s, I did it awhile
ago but I’m re-doing it.
I have no qualms about
taking an old piece of art
and re-working it into
something different.
So the world is my
oyster of raw materials
so I don’t care if
it’s metal or glass
or plastic or wood
or whatever it is.
If it’s a shape
that catches my eye
and inspires me, juices
up my imagination,
I make a piece of
artwork out of it.
Occasionally, I get really
lucky and somebody buys a piece.
I do not, I don’t know
that I really ever actively
pursued my art as a
commercial venture.
I’ve had some good
sales over the years
but it was, to me it’s
about self-satisfaction,
self-exploration.You test the limits
of your capacity.
– Now to wrap this
show up today,
we’re gonna meet
up with Jared Lees.
Now this guy makes
custom-made cutlery knives
and they are amazing
and they’re beautiful.
I don’t know if you should
hang them on the wall
and look at ’em or
actually use ’em.
Let’s go see what Jared
Lees knives are all about.
– Back in 2017 is when
I made my first knife.
It was February 2017 and
it was kind of by accident.
I had been putting handles
on knives before that.
That were already
made but that kind of
just led to me finding
resources to figure out
how to make my own knife.(mysterious music)I have no history of
metal work before this.
I’m a bass player and I’ve
always carried a knife.
I got onto Instagram.Instagram is really bad
for people’s wallets
because I tend to, I was
following a bunch of knifemakers
and I was like that
looks like fun.
So I kind of basically, because
I always carried a knife
and thought knives
were cool and seeing
other people making
knives, that’s kind of
what made me decide
to get into it.
And I didn’t think I
was gonna be anything
that lasted for more
than one or two knives.
And I made a knife and
because of my being a musician
I had a kind of decent
following from that
and people were giving
me money after I made
like two knives so
I’ve been figuring out
how to do it ever since.I primarily make chef knives.Santoku’s are like a
Japanese style chef knife
and those seem to
sell really well.
And occasionally I make
small everyday carry knives
or hunting knives.I’ve made a couple of big
camp knives like Kukris
and Bowie knives and a
couple of things like that
but that’s not my typical order.My typical order is
for kitchen cutlery.
(ominous music)The process usually starts
with just a bar of steel
and it’s forged to shape
as close as possible
and then I’ll do a
little bit of refining
on the grinder just to
clean up some of the edges
and just a little bit of
the profiling of the knife.
After that, it’s heat-treated.After it’s all heat-treated,
it’s to the grinder again
to clean up the bevels.Most of my customers like the
rustic forged finished look
so I leave some
of the forge marks
along the spine of the knife.So the bevels are
ground clean and it’s
as close to zero as
possible, which zero being
the measurement that’s
down to nothing.
And after that it is
hand-sanding the blade,
which takes a couple
of hours sometimes.
It depends on how
hard the steel is.
Different steels are
easier to sand than others.
Some of them, I just
work with cru-forge-V
and it was awful to sand.It took like three and a half
hours to do the whole knife,
which usually it takes me
like an hour and a half
for most of the
steels that I use.
After the blade is
hand-sanded, I attach a handle
and sculpt the handle.Once again, I use
the belt sander to do
most of the sculpting
of the handle
and then it’s
hand-sanding the handle
so it feels just
right and it’s smooth
and then it’s finishing
it with an oil
and then a final
finish with the wax.
And then after that, it
sits around for a few days
and then I look at
it and inspect it
and make sure I’m
happy with everything.
And then once I’m happy
with it, I sharpen it,
package it up, and ship
it out to the customer.
(ominous music)
(banging)
I make my knives, I
want ’em to be sharp.
To me, knives are not pry bars,they’re not screwdrivers,
they’re cutting tools.
So I tend to make, especially
for the kitchen knives,
the geometry of
the blade is thin
and I hand-sharpen each knife
on a set of water stones
to get the edge perfectly
across the board
without ruining the heat
treatment of the thing.
Sometimes when people
sharpen their knives
on a belt or a belt
sander, the blade gets hot
and you ruin the
temper of the steel.
So I do everything
cold with water stones
and it gives it
an edge that cuts
as good as anything
you’ll find out there.
(adventurous music)Being a bass player
has been awesome
for me being a knifemaker
because basically
without the help
of my bass guitar
building buddies out there,I don’t know how I would
have gotten up to speed
because they’ve sent
me so much wood to use
for the handles of
knives and that’s really
they were the way I
was able to get started
because my initial startup
costs weren’t that much.
So it’s just kind of
been acquiring more tools
as I go over time but really
the metal working thing,
my ties to it are
kind of minimal.
I found out after I
started making knives
that my great grandfather
was a blacksmith
and my grandfather had a
tool-sharpening business
on the side when he was younger.And I didn’t know
anything about that stuff
until after I started
making knives.
(mysterious music)I always tell people
that you’re not
just buying a
knife for yourself,
you’re buying a knife
for your grandchildren.
If you take care of my
knives, they should last
your lifetime and into the next.It’s one of those things
that it’s just a tool
that if you take care of
it, it’ll take care of you.
I have a couple of customers
that have come to me
for repairs for
knives that were like
their grandparent’s knife.Old French chef’s knife or
an old German chef’s knife,
and they just want
it kind of cleaned up
or maybe the handle is
starting to break a little bit
but the blade is still
fine and it just needed
a little TLC.You hear of these
samurai swords that are
from the 1700s
still being around
so these definitely
can last a lifetime,
if not more.– Thank you once
again for watching
this episode of Around
Akron with Blue Green.
Now if you have any
questions or comments
or you just want to
drop me an email,
you can go to
www.aroundakronwithbluegreen.com
or you can find me on
Instagram and on Facebook.
Thank you and have
an amazing day.
(loop music)Hey out there,
Akronites (groaning).
Thank you for joining me
here in my den of Akron,
as I like to call it,
where I think about
what I’m gonna do for next
episodes, do (blubbering).
Take two, hey out there…Hey out there, Akronites.Welcome once again to Around
Akron with Blue Green.
Now thank you for
joining (hacking).
I take a trip…I take a trip down to Blueberry
Hill to visit (blubbering).
I take a trip down to
Blueberry Hill to visit
the Wizard Grizzled
(blubbering).
Wizard (blubbering
and laughing).
That’ll be outtakes.I take a trip down
to Blueberry Hill.
(electronic music)

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