Asia Ward

Asia Ward


bass & staccato violins play (Asia) First I make like, a wooden back, and I use a nail gun to nail the first layer of aluminum. And that’s what this stuff is; it’s just really thin aluminum flashing you just put on houses. When I first started it was a more of a traditional diorama, so like, the pieces are layered like this, like one from each other and parallel, and then I realized that aluminum offered so much more potential for kind of layering it out in all different angles, which is really what I was going for anyways. I’m trying to develop all these angles to the piece, so it’s not just you look at it from the front, you can look at it from all different angles. So I have to kind of turn it over and tackle it in different positions. I float the layers by just using scrap aluminum. That way I can kind of position it in place, like hover them from layer to layer. buzzing Then I attach them by using these rivets, using like, a pop rivet gun. loud snap! I’m really digging on the shadows that they create, ’cause I feel like that fills in the gaps, that like, develops, it rounds the piece out, even though they’re square pieces, plain, stuck together, it’s all of a sudden round, almost like an armadillo. I put a couple pieces up, then I like to reduce the pieces down to more of what I was thinking of. I’m looking for a certain line. When I first started, I really wanted to work with paper, but paper can’t hold a lot of weight and you can’t build on top of it very high or it’ll just kind of compress. And I tried many different kinds of materials, but aluminum, I was going to the hardware store and I found aluminum. When I first started, I was pretty sure that it was going to work, ’cause it’s kind of like paper, but really, I didn’t like the shininess. I didn’t want it to look like the aluminum, and so I use this type of spray paint that makes things look powdery, and it kind of transformed it. to look more like paper, which is what I originally wanted it to be. I call my pieces aluminum dioramas. Most people have made a diorama when they were little kids, so it gives people kind of perspective that there are layers or dimensions to it– that’s a diorama aspect. I had this idea of what environment that I want to make, and this one is about, it’s called The Poor Mississippi, so it’s about the Mississippi, it’s about using the river as like a pathway for the eye to travel from one piece to the next. I tried to sketch it out and I used this little narrow graph paper because I’m trying to force myself to not spread out so far. It’s hard to draw a 3-dimensional shape, multiple planes, so I just kinda go for the lumps that I know I want to be there, like the composition. acoustic guitar & harmonica play softly I made this, it’s a sample tree, it looks kind of ugly, it’s been through a lot. So what I do is, I find a scrap; that way I can recycle all the pieces that I use. And then I just rib the pieces together and once I get the tree shapes that I like, then I can just attach it directly to the… The cool thing about using these trees, is that I can help people visualize a perspective, so if this is supposed to be closer and this is supposed to be far away and they’re still on the same plane, I can make a giant tree here and a tiny version over there, and it’ll help people like, lay it out in their head. tremolo electric guitar plays Okay, let’s see, how should I start out with? This film is neat, the pan, the angle is blue and certain angles it’s red. I had been working with lights and different light effects. And my friends had this piece, it’s a puddle and there’s like grass kind of coming out of it, and having the grass take over and not just the area around the puddle but the shadows kind of taking up all around it so it almost glows. And I’m using that same light effects to kind of make the puddle look like there’s different layers of mud. I want the public to enjoy the shapes and the lines. I like them to be able to recognize that it is a landscape. I want people to kinda take it out of context, away from the wall and then maybe into their own life or other visions they may have out in nature. That’s pretty simple I guess. playing country swing

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