Black Velvet Mystery Paintings – Lesson Plans

Black Velvet Mystery Paintings – Lesson Plans


(squeaking) (pop) (♪♪♪) WOMAN:
Have you ever seen
a painting done of black velvet? Many of us
slightly more mature people might remember bright,
gaudy velvet paintings that were sold in the
1970s in parking lots and highway off-ramps. Because of this less than
noble association, black velvet paintings
quickly became the epitome of bad taste, but actually, velvet painting
boasts a distinguished history. Produced in societies
all over the world, velvet art is
believed to have been invented by Islamic people who also wove
designs into the fabric. One of the oldest surviving
velvet paintings is a tiger from
19th century Japan that is on display at the Victoria and Albert
Museum in London. From Japan, velvet painting
was imported to the Philippines, then into Mexico in the 1930s, and finally,
into the United States. This project is exciting
because we’re going to use some non-traditional materials
on velvet. The fabric I have here
is actually a rayon velour. It comes on a 58 inch wide roll,
and is sold by the yard. I backed a Blick
Economy Canvas panel with the velvet
to add some rigidity. Any stiff backing
material will work fine. I’ve used Aleene’s
Quick Dry Glue, or even a strong tape
to secure it. So, once the panel is ready, we’ll just start creating a
pastel drawing on the surface. These Junior
Cray-Pas Oil Pastels work really well
on the fabric. They’re very opaque
and enjoyable to work with. There’s a beautiful tactile
quality working on these, on the velvet. There’s a velour paper
that is just for pastels and, if any of you
have worked on that, you know what I mean
about this tactile quality that you get on the surface; that just really pulls in
and holds tight. After the pastel drawing
is finished, we’ll get to the mystery
part of the project. Right on top of the oil pastels, we’re going to apply these Tri-Art UVFX Black Light
Poster Paints. They come in various
fluorescent colours, a glow-in-the-dark and also include
black light mediums that can be
mixed with the paint. These will go right on top
of the oil pastels. And since the pastels
are oil based, they help the paint
sit right on top, rather than being
absorbed down into the fabric. At this point, I would like to
think about what parts of
my imagery would glow if the lights
would suddenly go off. If you’re doing a cityscape,
maybe the lights would come on, or the headlights
of cars would glow. You might see
reflections in water, stars would shine. Maybe you’d even see reflections from the eyes of
the animals in the dark. As the paints dry on the velour, they actually soak in
and pretty much disappear. It will look like you just have
a nice pastel drawing. But… under a black light,
a completely new scene appears. Things that you didn’t see
in the pastel drawing pop out. I’m just using an inexpensive
black light flashlight, but there are
other viewing options for these mystery paintings. A full size black light
works in a dark room, but there are also
black light lightbulbs, or you could easily create
a small black light booth built from foam core
or even just a recycled box. Just a cut a hole
in the top for the black light and then cut out
a viewing area. If you’d like to learn
more about this project, visit DickBlick.com
and keyword search “Black Velvet Mystery.” Thank you for watching. (♪♪♪)

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