Children’s Bathroom Mural : Prep Bathroom for Painting Child’s Bathroom Mural

Children’s Bathroom Mural : Prep Bathroom for Painting Child’s Bathroom Mural


We still have a couple more things to do before
we can start actually painting our mural, and now we’re going to be moving into painting
preparation. We don’t want to get paint all over the bathroom, or at least not in the
areas we don’t want it to go, so first we’re going to start by taping. Get your nice blue
painter’s tape, and we’re going to basically use this to to tape over a lot of the edges.
You can already see like here on this, on this towel holder that we’ve painted over
the edge, or we’ve taped over the edges to prevent the paint from bleeding down onto
it. I also like to cover up the metal areas too, because you’re painting here; it’s active.
Paint can fly. You can get lots of paint droplets that’ll spray off the wall. So yeah, when
in doubt, cover it up with tape. It does not take that long. It’s also relatively easy
to get off. This is not duct tape, so don’t worry that it’s going to be a total marathon
to get it off. But yeah, definitely make sure that all the potential exposed surfaces are
covered, but don’t go overboard. You can see here in the wood, there’s a lot of wood exposed.
If I’m basically getting paint beyond this area, I need to really revisit my painting
technique, rather than taping any more. Next, we’re going to take off the various face-plates
and socket coverings around the bathroom area. You don’t want these to get paint all over
them, cause’ that, you know, it’ll stain. It won’t look good once you put em’ on. So
make sure and take these off, using a flathead screwdriver in a relatively easy process,
where you basically you know, put the screwdriver in socket, and then turn counter-clockwise
and then the faceplate will come off. Now, some people like to use blue painter’s tape
again, just to kind of tape over the face-plates like this. I don’t like it. First off, it’s
a lot of very fine edge taping, which is a little time consuming. It’s much easier just
to use a screwdriver; unscrew it, and then what I usually will do is I put a little bit
of painter’s tape over the socket just to make sure there’s not a lot of paint getting
into that exposed socket in there now, now that the face-plate’s off. Make sure to do
this again on your electrical outlets; also on your light switches. You probably shouldn’t
have cable or phone jacks in your bathroom, but check. Basically, what you want to do
is you want to remove anything on a wall, which is going to inhibit you from the nice
big up down of painting that you’re going to be doing. You don’t want to be start and
stopping a lot, so make sure that everything is covered up and ready to go, and even if
you have like a wild dash over something you didn’t mean to paint, it’s protected. The
last part of our painting prep is putting down a drop cloth. This is the last step before
we can finally get going on the mural, but this is to to intended to protect the floor
of our bathroom. You have a linoleum floor. If you don’t want to spend hours afterwards
still scrubbing tile, linoleum, almost anything. Paint gets onto it, and while it’s done it’s
as bad as carpet, which you probably don’t have in your bathroom. It’s still a righteous
pain to get out. So basically, put your drop cloth down. They have these in cloth or plastic.
Spread it out. Some people tape it to the edges. I just generally like to spread it
out to make sure all the floor is covered. Then you have everything ready to go.

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