Creating 3D Presentation Views

Creating 3D Presentation Views


Chief Architect has many camera
settings that can assist you in creating effective 3-D views. When you have a Chief Architect plan open
you can create a 3-D view by going to the 3-D menu, then down to
create perspective view. Perspective cameras are meant
to simulate a human perspective. They have a vanishing point unlike
orthographic views which are meant to maintain the scale of objects in the view, no matter your distance or angle to them. We’re going to create a perspective view
and I’m going to create a full camera. A full camera view is designed to allow
us to look as though we are standing within the scene as opposed to a full
overview which will automatically place you outside of the home looking down. The same goes for our
perspective floor overview, which will place you outside
the home looking down, except that you’re going to see only
the floor that you’re on without any ceilings or roof planes. So that’s
what we also call our dollhouse view. We’re going to create a full camera, so I’m going to select this tool and
notice that my cursor changed to a camera icon. This allows me to click where I want to
stand and drag in the direction that I would like to see, and when I release my mouse it will
open up a new tab for my camera view. To go back to the plan view, I can
simply click on the floor plan tab. Then to go back to the camera view, I can click on the camera tab or I can
double click on the camera to open that view. When I’m in a plan view
and I look under the 3-D menu, there are several options that
will be greyed out. For instance, our rendering techniques, which
we’ll go through here in a moment, some of our camera view
options and lighting options. The reason why these are greyed out in
a plan view is that they require looking at a particular 3-D view. So once we are in a camera
view and we go to that menu, when we go to our rendering techniques, we can suddenly see all of them
are available for us to choose. Same with our camera view options and
some additional lighting options as well as our material painter because we
can’t paste materials unless we can see materials. So while
within this camera view, I’m gonna take a look at
some of our camera settings. We can do this in one of two ways.
First, from the floor plan view, we can select the camera, click on it
just one time. So if I double click on it, it’s going to open up the camera view, but if I click on it just once I
can see my edit menu down here. So I’m going to come down to open object, the shortcut of which is Ctrl-E and this
is going to open up the camera settings as opposed to opening up the camera view. I’m going to show you another
way that we can find this. From within the camera view we can either
go up to the 3-D menu and go to edit active camera, or we can go to the shortcut here on
our toolbar for edit active camera. So I’ll select that and I’m going to
focus on just the settings that affect the 3- D view. I’m going to move my dialog off to the
side so that we can see what happens as we make changes. Most of these will
not update as we’re selecting them, so you won’t see a change in that
3-D view until we click okay, but there are some like the light set. I’m going in to adjust the lights so
that I can choose all of the lights that are in the kitchen, which I’m
looking at, and the living room, which is behind me. So I’m
going to first create a new set, going to call it kitchen and living room, and then I’m going to select all
of the kitchen and turn them on. I’m going to hold down my Ctrl key again
to select all of the living room lights and click one of the check boxes to turn
all of them on. Then I’ll select done, and now all other lights besides the
kitchen and living room are turned off. I’m also going to select to show shadows
so that we can see the shadows in this view. I’m going to show reflections, bloom was already selected which is that
haze that you see around lights within a 3-D view, and I’m going to
select edge smoothing when idle. All of these options will
enhance the 3-D view, but they may slow down your rendering
speeds so you may not want to have them on at all times. So then I’ll select okay and
you’ll see the effect take place. And when we’re in a full camera view
we’re not limited to the view that we opened up. We can use some tools
to help us move around in the plan. So under the 3d menu we have some
move camera with mouse tools. So we have the mouse
orbit that lets us turn. We have the mouse pan, which
lets us pan up and down, and there are several others that will
help you focus and tilt the camera. There are also some move
camera with keyboard options. I’m going to leave those the same. I’m gonna move back to the mouse
orbit camera. And with my keyboard, I’m going to use the arrow keys. The up
arrow will move me forward in the plan. The down arrow will move me backwards. The left arrow will help me to turn
left and the right arrow will help me to turn right. So this will allow you to virtually
walk through the home and look in any direction that you need to. If
we go back to our edit camera, we also have some positioning. So when we used the left and right arrow
keys that adjusted our camera angle, when we used the up and down arrows
that effected our X and Y position, which is the position that
we are within the plan. The height above floor is effected from
panning up and down within the plan and the tilt angle was
effected when we rotated. So this all looks very different than it
did when we opened it up just a minute ago. And if you want
a very specific angle, you can open up the camera
and type them in here. I also will use the scroll wheel on
my mouse in order to zoom in and out. So when I move forward with
the scroll wheel I zoom in, and when I move back I zoom out. It may be the opposite depending upon
your computer settings and when I clicked down on the mouse it
allows me to pan around so those can also be effective
ways to move within the plan. Now in the camera that we have open, we’re using what we call our
standard render technique. If we look on our toolbar here we can
see all of the techniques that we have available. These can also be found
as we saw earlier under the 3-D menu, rendering techniques. So I’m going to go through just
to show each of the techniques. So we’re in standard right now with the
particular settings that we’ve set up for our camera. You can go into a vector view which is
going to show all of our patterns in lines. We can do a glass house allowing us to
peer through objects such as cabinets and through walls into the
next room. A duotone, which is going to be like a sepia
effect, technical illustration, painting, watercolor, line drawing, and our
physically based render. Physically based render is the
closest to the standard render, but it adds in some additional lighting
and reflection options to make a more realistic image. It can take a couple
of seconds for it to take effect. And the final option is our Ray trace. So the Ray trace is yet
another photo enhanced image but unlike the physical based render
where we can move around within the scene, it’s going to take a snapshot,
almost like a picture with a camera. So when you select the Ray trace, it’s going to ask what
configuration you want to use. And once you have the
configuration you want, which you can choose new configurations
by either launching the assistant or by editing the current configuration.
And once that’s set up, you can click to Ray trace. This will export the image into a new
tab and begin to go through a series of passes. The more passes
that you allow to elapse, the more clear the image
will get. So the first pass, which may take a minute or two to
produce will not be as effective as later passes. I’m going to pause and let
this Ray trace go for a few minutes. So now we’re 16 passes
into this Ray trace, and the longer it goes the
clearer the image will become. There are additional image properties
found right here in the toolbar and these are similar to photo editing properties
that can affect the image further. This is a static image, so if I go back to my camera
view and I make any changes, my Ray trace will not be effected.
When finished with the Ray trace, you can click to stop it. Now we’ll
go back to my full camera view. Any image from the program can
be saved as a picture file, so if you go to file and then export,
you can select to export a picture. You can use the active window size
or you can make it larger or smaller depending upon what you need. You can also export a 360 Panorama and
either save it onto your desktop or save it into the Chief Architect cloud if
your SSA is active. You can name it, create a description, I’m going
to de-select save to disk, select okay. It’ll ask you to log into your account
and then when you log into your Chief Architect account online, you can go into your 360 panoramas and
you’ll find it there and you can either view it here or you can make it public, which will create a link for you to be
able to share with others or to embed on your website. You can also export 3-D models of
the home in much the same process, and those can also be saved to your
Chief Architect cloud account and used in our app, the 3-D viewer. And when you have a camera
that you like in the plan, all of the settings within the camera, including the particular render type
that you’re using, can be saved. You could do that either by opening up
your camera settings and clicking to save it, or by clicking the save option which is
right next to your edit active camera. When you select that and you close out
of a camera view when you go back to your plan view, as long as your
camera layer is turned on, which it is not right now. So I’ll open
up my layers to turn on the camera. You’ll find that saved camera in exactly
the same position that you drew it, and you can simply double
click to open it back up. So whether you want to present the
home in live views such as this, in exported picture files like this one, or an exported 360 images or 3-D
models on your Chief Architect account, there are many ways for you to create
effective 3-D presentations with Chief Architect.

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