DeafWaves – Episode 1

DeafWaves – Episode 1


Hello and welcome, viewers
from all over the world! And welcome to
Season 4 of DeafWaves! I’m now here
in Mexico! It’s lovely here!
Where I am now, the weather is not too cold
but it’s warm and breezy. I will show you
places I plan to visit and narrate
about them. I am now in
Mexico City. It’s in the
central part of Mexico. One thing I’ve noticed
is some differences in signs being used
by Deaf and hearing persons. As you may know
the sign for “thank you”, hearing people
would sign like this. As for Deaf people who use
Mexican Sign Language (LSM), they would sign
like this. Both different signs
are different but they both
mean “thank you”. Well, isn’t that
interesting! I’m interested in learning
Mexican Sign Language (LSM) in the
coming days! Next, we will show you
an episode of “Deaf Challenge”. It’s about
Sign Language interpreters and how things can
go wrong between Sign Language interpreters
and Deaf persons like erroneous
interpretation and misunderstanding.
Let’s watch! [Deaf Man:]
I’m Deaf. [Interpreter]:
I’m a Sign Language interpreter. [Teacher]: Now we are going
to study details of bones of the
lower half of the body, such as joints,
elbows, and ribs. [Deaf Student]: I have a question.
Do we have heel? [Interpreter]: That’s heel on this
part of human foot. No, you didn’t get it?
Look at it! Alright, I’ll show
it to you. [Deaf Student]:
Don’t show it to me, please! [Interpreter]:
This is the heel. Take a look! Loooook! That’s the heel! Understood? [Deaf Student]: Please continue
interpreting. I thought cowboys
did have spurs, but I didn’t know
that they, like us humans,
do have heels. [Interpreter]:
And, pelvic bone… [Deaf Student]:
What is a pelvic bone? [Interpreter]: Pelvic bone
is an important part of human skeleton. Hold on,
let me show you. [Deaf Student]: Please don’t
pull your shirt up! That’s enough! You can locate it
on the clipboard! [Teacher]: And now we will
begin to study the digestive
system. [Deaf Student]:
I have a question. How does the
digestive system work? [Interpreter]: Food doesn’t go
to stomach only. It also goes
through intestines and we have
them inside us. [Deaf Student]:
Intestines? What’s with the
zig-zag movement? [Interpreter]: Alright,
let me show you. [Deaf Student]:
No, don’t! [Interpreter]:
Oh, come on! Look at me! This is… [Deaf Student]: Don’t!
Please stop showing! You’re embarrassing me!
Please! [Interpreter]:
Oh, come on! [Deaf Student]: Just listen
and interpret! [Interpreter]: I’m sorry.
You can look at her. Oh, dear.
Come on! Sign Language
interpreters just don’t pull their
shirts up this way! Unbelievable that it
could happen in classrooms in
front of Deaf students! If I were
in their place, I would have
kicked her out! It’s important that
Sign Language interpreters perform their
job professionally. Next, I will talk about
visiting the remains of the Aztec
civilization in Mexico City. It was
was fantastic! Let’s watch! [Hernan:] There used to be
a network of underground tunnels
leading to different places like homes.
There used to be an Aztec emperor.
He ruled the place here. He was thought
to be divine and he was the head
of the Aztec religion. He would decide
whom he would make human sacrifices
to please the gods. Not all of this place
was taken over by the
Spanish army. [Anselmo]: Nowadays, we don’t
see much of the ancient
Aztec civilization. What we see here
are its remains. What happened
to them? [Erik]: Long time ago,
the Aztec people came to this place
and they settled. They built temples
like these models. Years later, the Spanish settlers
came and conquered this ancient city
and it was destroyed. [Anselmo]: When were the
Aztec pyramids built? [Erik]: They were built in
around 1325 A.D and afterwards. [Anselmo]: Wow. Let’s see
another model there. [Anselmo]: We’ve just seen
the model of ancient Aztec pyramids,
many of them gone. And, what is
this model? Can you tell me
something about it? [Erik]: It’s a scaled
model of what an entire Aztec city
looked like in the past. There used to be
large bodies of water around it.
These no longer exist today. [Anselmo]: So it was an ancient
Mexico City? [Erik]: Yes,
Mexico City. The ancient Aztec
pyramids were amazing! I learned a lot
about its history. Many of them are gone
but there are remnants of them today,
one of them is the Temple
of the Sun. I thought I could
climb all the way up but it was
impossible! It was hot
under the sun and I decided not to
go all the way up. Halfway up,
I lost my weight by 5 kilograms!
Hooray! If I had reached
the top, I would have lost
10 or 15 kilograms. I would be much
thinner, then! Alright, coming up next
is an interview with someone who is
very interesting! Let’s take a look! [Anselmo]: I’m excited
to interview him! He’s a boxer and
a famous one in Mexico! His name is Ray Najera
and this is his name sign. I’m excited to
interview you! You are a popular
boxer here in Mexico. How did you
become one? [Ray]: When I was
growing up, I’d been watching
a boxer throughout his
career. From watching,
I developed a love for
boxing and I was learning from him and
that’s how I became a boxer. [Anselmo]: While you
grew up boxing, did you have to
endure physical pains? [Ray]: Yes, I had
and I had to avoid my eyes from getting
hit and I had to take positions
to avoid blows. I had to keep
my arms up and shield myself from
punches. [Anselmo]: How many persons
have you boxed with and how many
matches have you won? [Ray]: I won eighty matches
and only lost five matches. I earned medals
and trophies. In 1975, I won a gold ring
and a boxing glove trophy. I participated in
the 1971 Summer Olympics. The referees there
forced me to withdraw from the Olympic Games
because I was Deaf. [Anselmo]: Do you have any
hearing and Deaf fans? Any differences
between them? [Ray]: I have more
hearing fans and they are
more louder than Deaf fans. [Anselmo]: May God give you
the strength! How about if we
have a boxing match? [Ray]: Alright,
let’s see! [Anselmo]: Let’s do it!
Come on! [Ray]: This is my
boxing glove necklace. [Anselmo]: Wow,
it’s so nice. [Ray]: That was
40 years ago. [Anselmo]: 40 years ago?
So nice! [Ray]: I’ve been using it
for many boxing matches. [Anselmo]: He used his
title name, El Silencoioso,
meaning Deaf and silent. This is so nice! I’m impressed! Alright, let’s
have a boxing match! Whoa, that was
fast! Quick ones! His fists are
rugged! How did you
get them rugged? [Ray]: I used the
punching bag. It gets
them rugged. [Anselmo]: I’m sweating.
Exhaused from boxing with him! Thank you
so much! “Thank you”
(in Mexican Sign Language). Wow, that was
amazing! My respects go to
the Deaf Mexican boxer. Now, it’s time for
DeafBeat! I’ve been surfing
the Net and I have found
something. Let’s have a look! [Film Critic]: Two days ago,
I went to watch a movie called,
“The Shape of Water”. The main character
was actually a hearing person, not Deaf, and mainly
used Sign Language. It was a lady working
in a laboratory and she happened
to see a strange-looking fish creature which was captured
and put in a large aquarium tank.
They established a non-verbal communication
and the lady started to teach
the creature several signs. To cut the story short,
it was a beautiful love, slow-motion
story. This was
a critic expressing his
own opinion. I did watch that movie
and I thought it was nice. I know that
there may be mixed opinions
and views. The actor was hearing and
she used Sign Language. Some criticize saying
that this character role should be played
by a Deaf actor. But, in that movie,
the character was a hearing person who
couldn’t speak. She was mute so
she chose to learn signs. So, I think that if
there are hearing persons around the world who
can hear but can’t speak, they can learn
Sign Language! It would educate
hearing audience to know that they
could learn Sign Language if they became mute.
They could be able to communicate
with Deaf persons. Ok, next, we are going
to talk about cooking! I love food! We are going to cook
some Mexican food! Let’s watch! [Anselmo]:
This is my home! What are you doing
here and who are you? [Amaury]: My name is
Amaury Sotelo and this is
my name sign. [Anselmo]:
And you’re a cook? [Amaury]: Yes, I am.
I’m going to make a Mexican dish and
it’s a popular one. [Anselmo]:
Alright! [Anselmo]: It’s a tomato. [Amaury]: I’m throwing
it away. Yes, we carve it out. We will not use this one. [Anselmo]:
It’s too hard. [Amaury]: It’s too hard,
not ripe. It’s softer. [Anselmo]:
Right, soft. [Amaury]:
This one is good. [Anselmo]: Right, this one
is dark and softer and the other is
brighter and harder. [Amaury]: Yes. And this is lemon.
It’s sour. [Anselmo]: Sour! [Amaury]: This is onion. [Anselmo]: It makes us shed tears
when we cut it. Do you shed tears? [Amaury]: No. [Anselmo]: Smells fresh! [Anselmo]: Ok, that was quick. [Anselmo]: Let me smash it
for you while you do
the cutting. [Amaury]: Here you go! What are you doing?
Don’t do it! [Anselmo]:
It tastes so good! [Amaury]: We cut it at
different angles. [Amaury]: Here in Mexico,
this one is popular. We even eat
it alone. It’s fresh. [Both]: This is Mexican! [Amaury]: Need to add
little more salt? [Anselmo]:
Delicious! Thank you! Thank you! You should try it at home! Easy and quick to prepare! [Ray]: Hmm,
it’s delicious! Would you like to have some? Come to Mexico! I love Mexican food! Do come to Mexico
and try it! Before I close,
I would like to talk about the
Aztec pyramids. It’s so
full of history. Many of them are gone
but when you come to see Mexico, you will see its actual remains
and you will be amazed. You must see it when
you come to Mexico! Ok, that’s all for now
and thank you for watching
DeafWaves! See you then! Transcript & Captioning: Mudar Al-Dabbagh

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