Elms One – Artist Sit Down

Elms One – Artist Sit Down


primary medium is spray-paint aerosol
mixed with latex paints sometimes it depends on the job or the project but my
first love is spray paint. Mainly from graffiti just growing up you know as a
teenager playing around with spray paint doing letter forms that kind of stuff
and that introduced me to basically art in general my motivation comes from just
a pure buildup of ideas you know that I can’t stop really getting the ideas and
if I don’t act on them it it almost like hurts me you know I get inspiration from
the people I paint with my crew all sorts of people I’ve met and and other
artists in the Boise area and nationally globally all sorts of inspirations in my
house my lady my daughter you know it kind of comes from everywhere and all
those factors just make me want to go and do something cooler better newer. Most of my designs are following kind of a path of ideas that have been
developed over the years. My individual work I kind of just bring
whatever influences I’m feeling that day into it and try to work it out on the
wall I love painting on walls especially large walls because it’s something that
is a fixture and especially if it’s in a public place you know anybody can walk
by and have their own interaction with it at any given time I like painting on
a large scale like that because if it’s larger than you the work will like
envelop you and draw you into it in a way that you can’t really achieve that
easily with a smaller piece or a canvas I’m a native Boisean and I’m like third
generation so I know this place well and when I was growing up and just
starting into it, it wasn’t very developed in the kind of art that I
do and so now being able to work at it full-time it’s a pretty cool way to
sculpt and mould the city in an image that I see it deserves I
think that what I do in the portraiture and realism stems directly from graffiti
that I did so without that there wouldn’t have been you know the style
that I work in now so I try to relate that to people and at least open
people’s minds a little bit to that as a stepping stone or as a you know
integral part of what a lot of these big murals you see where they come from and
how they’re created I’ve actually been in arguments with police officers
about the definition of graffiti and if it’s legal but if it’s on a legal space
but it’s still in the graffiti form does that make it what does that make it you
know it’s it’s there’s been for plenty of things but over the years I think
it’s like I said been developed into a little bit more acceptable way to work
right now my focus is really developing the concepts that I want to be heard and
want to see in our city and in the world and making that more of a
priority in my life and in my art expression you know it’s a way to do
something more fulfilling I feel like in the long run
and at some point there’s that transition where a lot of artists feel
that push it’s just a really direct way to talk to people to speak to people
on your terms and on their terms I think art is just one of the rare places where
you can communicate with somebody very directly those people are gonna interact
with that and whatever goes through their mind when they’re looking at that
is something that you is a conversation you’re having with them
directly through the art I’m just thankful for the people that are in
Boise both the artists and just the residents who have kind of made it a
priority to include these things in the city and its life I don’t see
stopping ever I think it can mutate and morph into all sorts of different
manifestations I like to sketch too, I like to do digital
drawings I like to paint occasionally and I don’t see why those things can’t
all interact in some way that keeps me interested and there’s a puzzle that’ll
never be solved or you know you never get to the end of being creative so I
think it’s something that’ll keep me stimulated forever.

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