How to make Art Prints (Paper cutting) | Editing and printing basics guide

How to make Art Prints (Paper cutting) | Editing and printing basics guide


If you’ve ever thought about preserving your
papercuts and presenting them in a different way, art prints are a nifty idea. Once you find a papercut you’d like to turn
into a print, set it on a white surface and make sure to
shoot in RAW mode. I used a Canon camera and here you can see
that the photo is not compressed, which is perfect for editing. Jpg images
are compressed and therefore the editing options will be limited. Not all free photo editors can work with RAW
images, but here is one that works very well, it’s called Polarr. I first rotated the image and cropped it,
if possible, use a tripod when taking photos and do it straight down. My photo was taken at an angle so I had to
crop a bit more. I like that you can straighten the
photo too, it’s very useful. I zoomed in a bit to show you how nice the
quality is, the camera captured every single detail and even paper fibers. This was a test papercut, so I wasn’t too
concerned about cutting precisely, but I’ll show you
how you can fix those imperfections. For now, go to adjustments and play with the
settings. If you’re not familiar with photo editors
and all of these options, don’t be scared to still use it. Try out different settings to see what looks
best and just go for it. I adjusted the contrast, blacks and whites,
and since I had a lot of colourful pieces as papercut infills,
I adjusted the temperature and vibrance. If you want to stay true to the original papercut,
have it on your desk for reference and check if the colour on the screen matches the one
on your papercut. I wanted the colours to be bright and cheerful. Because this is in RAW, I can easily achieve
that. Once you’re happy with how it looks, open
it in GIMP, which is a free software. I had a lot of grey space left around the
lettering because that’s where the shadows were, the editor used before can’t really
fix that. If you use the fuzzy select tool, click on
that space and press delete, you’ll be left with a pure white background. I didn’t like
how the letters turned out, so I used the eraser to remove the text. Fuzzy select, eraser and clone tools are probably
the ones you’ll be using with your own papercut too and they can all be found in this toolbox
so there’s no need to be familiar with this software, it’s very easy to use. The tool options window is automatically opened
as well, so you have everything ready to go and you don’t have to search for anything
which will save you a lot of time. To fix small imperfections, I love to use
the clone tool, its icon looks like a stamp in the toolbox. Find the spot you want to fix and then find
an area that is what you want that spot to look like in the end. Hold the control key and click the desired
area, then you’ll be able to paint over the spot and the pixels from your selected area
will fill it in. As you move the mouse, the selection will
move too so the colours will blend. It adds to the look, there’s no need to worry
about blending the colours, they’ll do that on their own because of this feature. I erased paper fibers and cleaned up the edges
with this tool, so it’s incredibly useful. You might need to adjust the brush size and
hardness to be able to paint over tiny areas. This takes some time, but it’s definitely
worth in the end. I added my text in a slightly different font,
but I changed my mind later and added the full text using the same font as the one on
the papercut. I’m done with editing, but I wanted to resize
it so I opened it in Inkscape. Even though you can resize
in MS Word, I often find that it turns out smaller or bigger once printed so I rather
use Inkscape to be sure I won’t be wasting any material. Import the photo, go to Object, Transform
and a window should appear on the right. To resize, go to the ”Scale” tab
and type in your desired measurements. I like how many options are here, you can
resize by pixels, cms, inches, percentage and more. Export the file and it’s ready for printing. I showed how I print and cut my prints in
the ACEO making video, if you’re interested, here is the final print. You can definitely see the difference between
the edited image and the RAW one. You can use all of these tips to create your
own artwork prints, let me know in the comments if you make some and feel free to share
a few photos over at my Facebook page. Thank you for joining me today.

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