How to Paint a Room with Wickes

How to Paint a Room with Wickes


How to Paint a Room In this video, we’re going to show you the best techniques to use when painting a room. You’ll find a full list of tools and materials you’ll need at the end of this video. PREPARE SURFACES In order to get the best finish it’s crucial that you have properly prepared the surfaces that you plan to paint before you start painting. If you haven’t done this yet, watch our videos ‘How to prepare walls and ceilings for painting’ and ‘How to prepare interior woodwork for painting’. It’s also worth completely emptying the room before you start, as this will make the job of painting much easier. If you can’t remove the furniture, move it to the middle of the room and cover it well with protective sheets. When choosing paint, bear in mind that there are a wide range of paint types, that each give a different finish, so please visit our website or ask instore for more details. MEASURE AREA TO PAINT Before buying your paint make sure you measure your walls and ceiling, don’t worry about subtracting doors and windows as it’s always good to have a bit more than you think you need. Check the paint packaging to see how much to buy to cover your surface areas. Make sure you buy each type of paint in one go to ensure it’s from the same batch as there can be very slight differences in colour. PAINT CEILING UNDERCOAT Always make sure to start with the ceiling. This is so that if any paint drips, it’s only dripping on to surfaces that are yet to be painted. The best way to paint a ceiling is to use a roller with an extension pole. It’s safer than painting from on top of a ladder and is more comfortable to keep this up over a long period. A roller is likely to spray and drip as you paint, so be sure to cover the floor completely, wear old clothes and protect your eyes with goggles. For textured ceilings, use a longer pile roller this will ensure the paint will work into the undulations of the texture, and use a shorter pile roller for smooth finish ceilings. If your roller is brand new, ensure you wash it thoroughly before use to remove manufacturing particles and loose pile. Then let it dry thoroughly. If your ceiling is bare plaster you will need to prepare it properly before you apply the top coats, see our video ‘How to prepare walls and ceilings for painting’ As with all paint give it a good stir before you use it with paint stirrer or an off cut of wood. Start painting the ceiling by ‘cutting in’, with a medium sized brush. This means painting a strip about five to seven centimetres thick around the edges of the ceiling. When cutting in the ceiling you’ll need to use a step ladder but make sure you don’t over stretch. It’s a good idea to transfer some of the paint into a small container such as a paint kettle so you’re not carrying a heavy tin up the ladder. As we’re painting the walls next we don’t need to worry about a neat edge where the ceiling meets the wall. It’s best to cut in and paint the adjacent sections of ceiling at the same time so that you avoid a visible line where paint has dried at different times. If there are two of you painting together, make sure the person cutting in does not get too far ahead of the painter with the roller. You’re now ready to start painting the rest of the ceiling. Transfer some of your paint into a paint tray and load the roller, be careful not to overload it as it will drip and slide on the ceiling rather than roll. It’s a good idea to roll with a mixture of up and down and ‘W’ motions to avoid getting visible lines and remember to focus on the area you have just cut in to, to ensure you’re blending wet paint with wet paint as that’s the best way to avoid banding. Carry on around the ceiling in the same fashion until you have covered the entire ceiling. If you have ceiling lights don’t forget to cut in around the fittings before you roller the area. Make sure that your room is well lit, so that you can clearly see any areas that you’ve missed and make sure that the paint looks even from every angle. Check the manufacturers instructions for a guide to drying time and once you’re sure that the first coat has completely dried, apply a second coat in the same way. Two coats will be enough on light coloured previously painted ceilings, and on freshly plastered ceilings as long as you’ve prepared it properly. For more information, watch our video ‘how to prepare walls and ceilings for painting. To avoid having to clean brushes and rollers between coats wrap brushes in cling film and rollers in plastic bags secured with rubber bands. PAINT WALL UNDERCOAT Next paint the undercoat of the walls. Begin by protecting fittings such as light switches, sockets and any woodwork that you’re not planning to paint with masking tape, leaving an overhang to protect it from drips as much as possible. Using a roller, and a brush for cutting in, apply the undercoat of white emulsion on the walls before you apply your top-coat. For dark coloured walls it’s best to use two coats of white emulsion however one coat would be sufficient for walls previously painted with a light colour. You don’t need to worry about blending wet paint with wet between the cutting in and rolling on these coats as you will be covering them with two top coats. PAINT WOODWORK UNDERCOAT It’s worth doing the under coat on any wood work (if you haven’t done it already) before you do the top coat on your walls. This is so you don’t need to be too precious about a perfectly neat edge where any wood work meets the wall. Your woodwork should have already been prepped for painting, see our video ‘How to prepare interior woodwork for painting’ for more information. Starting with the windows, apply masking tape to the windowpane, and either mask or remove any fittings such as locks, latches, hinges etc. Then, give the frames and sills an undercoat using interior woodwork primer and undercoat paint. Alternatively you could use a combined primer and undercoat to save time. Remember to open your windows as you paint, so that you don’t seal them shut. Then, paint the frames and sills with a suitable wood undercoat. Use a small brush for windows. In the same way, mask off areas you want to protect and apply the primer and undercoat to skirting boards, architraves and doors. When doing the skirting boards take particular care to protect your floor, it’s worth putting down masking tape and attaching your protective sheets. Finish off by doing the architraves and doors. Clean your brushes using water for water based paints or white spirit for oil based paints. Let the undercoat dry following manufacturers instructions. PAINT WALL TOPCOAT In the meantime you can paint the walls with their top coat. Start by using a brush to cut in again, from the ceiling and corners as well as around any woodwork such as window or door frames or skirting boards. As with the ceiling cut in one area at a time to minimise visible lines. To cut in along the ceiling line make sure you use a medium sized brush and don’t over load it. Take your time and make nice smooth and steady strokes using the corner of the brush to create a straight line. Don’t over stretch on the stepladder not only is it dangerous it will also increase your chances of getting paint on your ceiling. If you do accidentally get wall paint on your ceiling wipe it off quickly with a dry cloth. You can always touch it up with emulsion when you’ve finished. When you’re done with the cutting in, use a roller to fill the main body of the wall. Remember don’t overload your roller. (Using a roller with an extension pole) start at the top in a corner and do about a metre and half across and then move down to the bottom half. As with the ceiling paint, roll with a mixture of up and down and ‘W’ motions to avoid getting visible lines. This will minimise stripes and ensure good coverage. Paint entire walls in one go to avoid marks where the paint has dried at different times. For an even professional finish, give each wall two coats; making sure that the first coat is completely dry before moving on to the second. PAINT WOODWORK TOPCOAT All that’s left to do now is to put the topcoats on your woodwork. It’s best to put two coats on woodwork for a longer lasting and more protective finish. We would recommend using a water based product as they are quick drying, don’t smell like solvent based paint and the white options don’t yellow. We’re using a gloss paint as our top coat which will give a shiny finish, you can opt for a satin, eggshell or matt finish but it’s all down to personal preference. . As with the undercoat start with the windows, followed by the skirting boards and then architraves and doors. Interior woodwork paint tends to be thicker than emulsion so it has a tendency to slowly drip if too much is applied in one go. Be mindful of this as you paint and don’t overload the brush. Use a suitably sized brush and take your time on any edges that meet your painted walls. Oil based paints are harder to wipe off surfaces if you make a mistake but don’t worry, if the wall won’t wipe clean you can always touch it up with emulsion when you’ve finished. Wait for the first coat to fully dry before applying the second with the same process. Check manufacturers instructions for drying times. Now all that’s left is to let the last coat dry and carefully remove any masking tape and replace any fixtures or fittings. Remember that even when your new paint is dry to the touch it will take several days to dry thoroughly. Here is a list of the tools you’ll need to paint a room Here are the materials you will need And here is the Safety Equipment you will need

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