How To Screed A Shower Base – DIY At Bunnings

How To Screed A Shower Base – DIY At Bunnings


I’m going to show you how to screed a shower
base. The tools I require for the job are some wood,
a saw horse, a clamp, a saw, some trowels, mixing gear, safety equipment, and some measuring
equipment. I’ll also need some sand, some powder mastic, and some cement and a few buckets
and a level. All right. We’re just going to check the shower
base for high and low spots. The high spots could protrude through the screed and then
make the tiles uneven. There doesn’t seem to be any high spots so we’re going to move
on to the next step. The next step is to cut wedges which run from
the corners of the shower base into the middle. The reason for this is to allow the water
to run from the outside of the shower base into the grate. Now I’m going to measure the
shower base the full width to know how big to cut my wedges. Now we got 1,200 in total
from corner to corner of the shower base and that means we’re going to do 600 wedges. So
it’ll go right from the corner right to the middle of the base. I will have to cut these on an angle, but
first I’m cutting them to length. Now I’m going to mark my wedge. The shower base that
I’m doing today is 20 ml deep. So I’ll start my cut at 20 ml and run all the way down to
6 ml at the other end. 14 millimetres with a framed shower is a good amount of run off.
Now I’ll use another piece of timber to mark the wedge. And now we’re going to secure this bit of
timber with our clamp and cut along the line we just made. Just be careful at the other
end because it is very narrow so take it slow. So repeat that process three more times and
we got our four wedges. I’m going to put some rags down the drains
ensuring that they’re tightly fitting to stop and screed or glue going down the drain and
blocking it. Now I’m going to put my wedges that I’ve just cut into place. Now we just
gotta make this screed and put the glue down. This screed is made of 1 part cement to 4
parts sand and a little bit of water. The consistency should be like a wet beach sand
so that if you throw it gently it should stay in a ball and not break apart but not so wet
that it slops through your fingers. Be careful not to add too much water, because adding
too much water will make it go sloppy and you don’t require much to gain the consistency
that you require. Now we’re going to mix up some powder mastic
to spread down on the shower base before we screed. You put some powder mastic into the
bucket and add a little bit of water and mix until it’s a toothpaste consistency. We’re
going to put the glue down in the shower base first so the screed has something to stick
to. First, remember to remove you wedges before
spreading the glue so you get a nice even spread on the shower base. Spreading the glue
down with a small notched trowel is desirable as too thick of bed of glue will cause the
screed to shift. Next we’ll stick the wedges back in and fill
the whole shower base with screed. Now we’ve put the screed in the shower base.
We’re going to spread it out so that it covers all of the glue and the wedges. We’re going
to use a flat trowel to do this. Now I’m going to scrap the screed back to the level of the
wedges. Which we placed into the glue and that’ll create the fall for the shower base. If there’s any small areas that you need to
be a bit careful with you can use a smaller bit of wood, a small spirit level, or even
better a poly float. It’s important to get each section flat. Even if that requires moving
a little bit of screed from one section to another to build up the level. This may take
a while but the extra effort you put in now will save when tiling. Now we’re going to remove the wedges and allow
the screed to dry. When the screed is dry we will then fill in the gaps created by the
wedges with more screed. Make sure you remove the rag now so the screed doesn’t dry over
the top of the drain or get lodged in it. Make sure there’s no screed down the drain
pipe and all the little bits of screed which have fallen on top, let them dry, it’s much
easier to remove them when they’re dry. Now we’ve allowed the screed to dry, we’re
going to put a rag back down the drain and tidy up. To make sure you got a nice even surface,
any uneven pieces you can scrape with a spatula. Make sure you sweep the lines out after you’ve
removed the last of the excess from the surface of the shower base. It’s important to remove
any rubble from the lines otherwise the screed that you’re about to fill it with will not
stick. The next step is to fill all of the gaps with
a bit more screed. To fill the gaps I’m using a spatula to push the screed in and then to
cut it off flat on the surface. Make sure not to over fill the screed lines as you don’t
want high spots when the job’s dry. Now we’ve filled the gaps with screed, we’re
going to sweep up the access and remove the rag from the drain. Now we’re going to allow
this to dry and then give it a final sweep and it’s ready for tiling. And that’s how you screed a shower base.

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