mural printing 3

mural printing 3


okay….im gonna try…to get the whole paper
saturated as quickly as I can…this paper is a little challenging to get under the chemistry
because it wants to curl up so much. its very curly. I’m just using … a rocking action…to
get developer… onto the paper…sometimes its hard to tell until the color starts coming
up. wether or not it’s all covered. that looks pretty good…okay.. so now I’m gonna get
into my agitation pattern…tip it vertically and horizontally…side to side, corner to
corner…and I’m basically using a rocking action to flow the developer over the entire
surface of the print. and I’m going to do this for a full there minutes. normally when
i use fiber paper i develop for about 2 and a half minutes, but because this paper is
so difficult to get submerged and it takes so long, i like to have a slightly longer
development time… it gives me a little more freedom. and that does influence the contrast
but I just adjust my printing accordingly. this is coming up nicely…
okay…so it looks like we’re getting into the last minute already…these trays are
really great because they require a lot less chemistry than troughs that are usually used
for mural printing. it only takes about one gallon to fully cover the print, whereas the
troughs oftentimes take 2 and a half to three gallons. so the timer… we’re coming up to
the last 30 seconds now…so … I’ve got that agitation flowing the developer all around
the print…to make sure it’s nice and even…never want to leave a print in a try like this,
just sitting. because sometimes the bottoms not always flat and the developer may not
be covering all of the print at once. so, very careful … hopefully I didn’t just ding
this print…roll it up…rolling it up smooths out – pushes the chemistry off – and I also
like to give it a little bit of a drain…just tip it on it’s side and allow it to drain…and
I’m gonna bring it over to the next bath, is “stop.” and i’m just gonna do the same
exact process as with the developer, though it’s just outside of the camera visibility.
okay…once I get it fully submerged in the stop I’ll reposition the camera. okay… that
looks good. not sure if you can see but, it’s the same technique as the developer…one
large tray, small amount of chemicals…and that should do it…I’ve tried doing mural
printing with a water stop bath before … i don’t recommend it. because … uh… it can
be difficult to fully stop the development action on such a large print adequately, and
the risk of damage is pretty high. so… use a chemical stop, an acid stop, you’ll have
a lot more success. over here I have a trough of fixer. I’m submerging it in…and I’m just
going to roll it though there for two minutes…I’m using a two fix system today. which means
that I have two different fixer baths. the first one tends to expire pretty quickly,
and the stays really fresh. so even the expired fixer can still take a lot of silver out.
and it helps to keep the second one from expiring. So that means that I’m able to always have
fresh fix and save some money…and ensures the archival processing because I’m not worried
that the fix has expired. so it’s always fresh. I’m just rolling it through this trough…
of fixer. okay…I’m gonna bring it over to the other fixer now. With the fixer, i tend
to let it drain a little longer… there’s not as much of a rush as there is with the
stop and developer. I have one more tray outside of your vision.. and it has my second fixer
in it. I’m just gonna get that set up and then…I will show you the results. alright…
lights on…the moment of truth. oh, yes…that looks great….i’m just looking it over for
flaws…anything that I might change before I move on… it’s a real pain in the ass to
come back to it later… and reprint it. a lot better to just do it right away. so that
you don’t have to get set up again. looks pretty good…I think that that is the final
version. and I’m very excited about it…check the focus… make sure everything looks good.
looks really great…that aught to do it.

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