Painting Ceilings & Walls | Brush & Roller | DIY

Painting Ceilings & Walls | Brush & Roller | DIY


Hey everybody. We’re up to the next stage of this conversion
of a garage into a usable room. I’ve taken you through the processes of rendering,
wall framing, taking the roof off and fitting insulation, all the stages of plastering. Now we’re up to the painting. I’ve been painting for years and years. There’s all sorts of gimmicks and different
ways of doing it but I find that the old and tried are the true methods. We have raw walls and plasterboard. We’re not dealing with existing work. We have here new work so what I find is best
is 3 coats of paint. An undercoat and 2 top coats. You always need good quality undercoat and
top coat paints. Don’t be fooled by the claims that cheap paints
will somehow do an incredible job. One coat wonders and the like. Generally it is not worth the money. Your better off spending your money on quality paint brushes and rollers. I don’t believe in all the gimmicky things
that claim they will make painting easier either. It’s a slow and steady hand that will get
you there and with practise you’ll get quicker. I’m going to show you how to do new work and in another window I’ll show you how to paint windows. I’ve painted hundreds of windows in my working life. I’ve come up with a slightly differnet method
compared with what is generally accepted, but for me it does a great job. I’ll also be painting the floor. Ceiling walls and floor. We work our way from the top to the bottom. I’ve gotta cut it all in. All the corners will be cut in. Then I will roll it with a 270mm roller. That might be a bit big for some. You may prefer to start with shorter roller. I’ll be using a roller handle. Also a scaffold for the cutting in. Before you can start painting you need to
make sure your paint is all mixed up. it’s been sitting on a shop shelf for who
knows how long, it therefore needs a really good stir. But even better than stirring is to get all the paint out of the tin and empty into another container. So you can get to
the bottom of the can and any residue. Stirring alone is often not enough. This one is pretty good. Try and do your undercoat in the same or similar
colour as you top coat. In this case everything will be white so it
makes my job a lot easier. If your painting in colours you need to make sure your retailer tints your undercoat accordingly. Make sure you get everything from the bottom
of the can. Then stir it. Then pour it back into the original can. I’ll use this paint pot to work from. If you are working with colours you will need to mix the paint backwards and forwards between pots. That will take care of the stirring process. First up the cutting in. All ready to go. It’s now a matter of cutting in all those
corners. Everywhere that the roller can’t get at. There you go. The cutting in is all done. A couple of things to note. With undercoat, talking about the quantity, you will use approx twice as much undercoat as top coat. If you do 3 coats of paint including 2 top coats. You’ll basically use the same amount in your
undercoat as you will in the 2 top coats. You will also notice I have not fitted the
architraves nor the skirtings. Being new work I have the option of fitting
them after the second coat or third coat. This makes the painting a lot easier. I’ll show you how I do that when we get to that stage. This way you can paint right up to the door
jamb and not do any cutting in. Another thing is to always maintain a wet edge. When you are painting a section like this,
firstly you don’t stop half way and go have a coffee. You do the whole thing in one go. As you work along you need to maintain a wet edge. So always brush back on you work. Go back over your work. Once to get rid of the brush marks, but more
importantly to make sure the whole thing stays wet. Then make sure the bottom edge is brushed off. Put the paint on then brush it off. Otherwise you’ll end up with a thickness of
paint that could run. That is what you do not want. Always brush off the edges. This will help keep an even consistency with
the thickness of paint. Now it’s time to move onto the roller. I’m using a new roller. It needs to be dipped in water and spun dry. This keeps the paint from clogging up the
base of the nap. I’m using a 12mm nap roller. I prefer a lambswool roller when available. This is a bit of a cheap and nasty one. A 10 or 12mm nap roller is needed for this work. Work from the top down. This allows any drips or runs to be dealt
with as you go. Watch for any bits of fluff or foreign particles. It might need a light sand when it’s dry. Keep a wet edge. Keep the roller facing in one direction. There are different pressure points on the roller. It takes a bit of getting used to, especially
if you use these wider rollers. Start with a smaller roller if you are not
used to using them. I put the paint on ahead of where I left off. Then I work back to the former finish. This dries the left hand edge of the roller as I work backwards, then when the same consistancy of paint on the wall is achieved I start to go forward. So the paint is always applied ahead of where
you left off with the last roller load of paint. Day 2 and we are ready to paint the top coat. Check out the room though. It’s all undercoated. Talk about being in a white room. Eric Clapton would understand. A little tip for overnight when you are using
the same brush and roller the next day. A lot of people wash everything out each day. You’ll save a lot of time and energy if you
do one of two things. Either drop them in water over night and spin
them out the next day. Or even better, put them in a plastic bag. Unwrap it and you’re ready to go. You will need a new bag each night because
the paint will dry inside the bag. If you’re changing colours you will need to
wash them out. If you’re not changing colours though, this
is the easy way to go. I’m going to show the different stages. Starting with this undercoat. It appears as though you can see through it,
but it is actually all sealed up. Now I will roll on the first of the top coats
and after that we will have a look at it dry. We’ll look at the difference between the three stages. Let’s get into the two top coats. What do you think of that. This is the dry first top coat. Now for the second top coat. Maybe a light sand but it’s not too bad. I thought I may have picked up a bit of grit
of the floor in the cutting in stage. It all looks pretty good. Maybe I’ll give this wall and the ceiling
a very light sand before going on. If your paint is nice and clean then you may
not have to sand between coats. Always check though – just in case. Now for the final coat. It’s all done. Check out the finish. You cannot see through that at all. Perfectly finished wall. No sign of the plaster work. The corners are looking really nice and square. I really like the way it’s finished up. You’ll notice I haven’t done the archs and skirts. I’ll do them now. How am I going to do that? Let’s find out! The architrave is now fitted. A couple more things to do. A bit of gap filler to run up the back of the timber. Then touch up the wall because of the gap filler. I rub off any gap filler on the pre painted timber. The architrave itself is already pre painted. I will go over the face of it however. This saves several episodes of cutting in. Normally there would be three different tradesmen involved in a job like this. A plasterer, a painter and a carpenter. Doing the whole lot myself allows me to get
away with a few short cuts like this. That’s it, everything is done. Check out my video on how to paint windows.

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