Phil Collins – A Bit Of A Parking Problem & But First… The Final Documentary (Eng, Esp, Por, Fra)

Phil Collins – A Bit Of A Parking Problem & But First… The Final Documentary (Eng, Esp, Por, Fra)


Could you open the barrier, please? Thank you. Superintendent Walter Strange
is my name. l was asked to investigate
some complaints about bad parking of trucks and buses and to interview some people
involved with this Bill Collins and his tour. lt’s my job to get to the bottom of it.
lt’s a serious problem. Shabby parking upsets the neighbours.
So that’s what l’m here for. Follow me. You’ll find it interesting. Half on the pavement, half on the road.
Not a good example of leaving a truck. Completely haphazard. – No regard for other people. Excuse me.
– Hello. l’m lnspector Strange.
Superintendent Strange. – Eli…
– Cohl. – Eli Cohl.
– Carpenter. – You don’t drive any trucks?
– Different department. Excuse me.
l think we’ve found something here. – What would be your name?
– Kerry. – l don’t do a lot, to be honest.
– Does Bill Collins know that? What’s your job
when you do do something? – Catering and the dressing rooms.
– l’m Tanya. – You feed the entire Bill Collins crew?
– Everyone. – l might come by for a cup of tea.
– They’re 20 pence. – So what is your name?
– Noel Rush. What do you do? Assistant tour manager
and security director. Obviously, you probably
don’t actually drive the trucks? – Superintendent Strange, local council.
– A bloody jobsworth. You’re the only person
l’ve met so far with an attitude. That comes with management. – What would be your name, then?
– l’d be Tony Smith to you. Management? So l’ve been asked to make a dossier
on all the Bill Collins group… – lt’s Phil Collins.
– ls it? The parking has caused
complaints from neighbours. What neighbours? l can’t see any. l agree that there does seem to be
a distinct lack of neighbourhood. l think you should
go back to your notebook. There are no neighbours,
so how could there be a complaint? Have you ever worked in social services?
You’d be quite good at it. Probably l would be.
Darned sight better than some. ”No neighbours,” l’ve written.
l’ll note that and see how l get on. – Go back and tell your office.
– l have to see my job through. – lf you don’t mind.
– Carry on. l’m surprised Bill Collins is popular
with a manager like that. l have not been spoken to like that
for many a year. Excuse me. lt’s quite an undertaking, isn’t it?
Putting this stuff up every day. Two minutes.
l’ve got a strange bloke questioning me. – That’s nice.
– Sorry about that. – Your name?
– Humeniuk. Humeniuk… Mike Humeniuk. – And your job?
– At the moment, l’m the cleaner. At the moment?
So you are a man of no fixed abode. – ls this what you do every day?
– l’m in it for the glamour. – ls there any glamour?
– One lives in hope. – That’s not…
– lt’s OK, don’t worry. – lt’s not falling down?
– lt’s all right. The troublemaker’s behind me again.
Management. Superintendent Strange…
l won’t shake your hand. – What would be your name?
– Ruud Werkhoven. – Ruud?
– R-U-U-D… Yeah. W… – Not English, then?
– No, Dutch. – And your job would be?
– Motion control. – Motion control?
– All movements… – Movements?
– Movements of things during the show. During the show?
What moves? – The circle goes up and down.
– The circle of lights? My word. lt says Production Office, so we should
get to the bottom of things here. – What would be your name, sir?
– Howard Hopkins. From your accent l can tell
you’re not from England. – l’m from America.
– From the US. – And your job?
– Production manager. l just met another manager.
Man with a beard. Very rude. – That’s probably the personal manager.
– ls it? – His name was Smith.
– Yeah, the personal manager. l’m gonna report him.
He’s a nasty piece of work. – ls it long hours, your job?
– We start at 7 a.m. And we finish around 3 a.m. So that means
you only get four hours’ sleep. Roughly. With a nap in between, maybe. Depending on how long
Mr Collins keeps us on stage. – Does he know you nap in between?
– l hope not. – Your secret’s safe.
– You want a character reference? Bill Collins, Phil Collins, Phil Bon Jovi… He swans in about five every day,
thinks he owns the place. Eats a bit of sushi,
sings a couple of songs and goes home. Mr Jones, Mr Hopkins
and the young lady. Not the first.
l met two young ladies in catering. – Your name?
– Jane Finn. – And you would be?
– Production assistant. So what would you actually be doing? – A little bit of everything.
– Really? l’ll make a note of that. ”Does a bit of everything.” – Your name would be?
– My name is Scotty Duhig. – And your job?
– l’m in charge of the wheels. All the wheels on the boxes. – You take care of the boxes?
– Just the wheels on the boxes. – Confetti…
– Confetti? Confetti out of the wheels. You’re not taking the mickey out of me?
l mean… Wheels l can handle, but confetti? During the production,
there’s a big confetti gag, as we say. And this confetti
seems to get everywhere. So you’re in charge
of getting it out of the wheels. – ls that the full extent of your job?
– l go round the world with Mr Bon Jovi. Mr Bon Jovi.
He’s got lots of nicknames, hasn’t he? – Bon Jovi’s quite a good-looking chap.
– Jon, not Phil. – Does he always dress like that?
– Sometimes l wear less. – My name is Joey.
– And surname? Chardukian. – And your job would be?
– Lighting technician. l just met
rather a small gentleman in there who said he usually started at seven
and finished at three. He’s not getting enough sleep,
which could be why he’s not tall. The good thing about those hours
is you don’t have a problem sleeping. Maybe Mr Collins’s agenda
is to give everybody a good night’s sleep. l can see the logic. Thank you, Joey.
lt’s been nice talking to you. l doubt this’ll go anywhere,
but l’ll get your address from the short gentleman
and the rude one. Superintendent Strange, local council. – Your name?
– Brad Marsh. – Your job?
– l set up drums for Phil. – Phil?
– Bill. – Bill or Phil?
– l think it’s Bill. lt’s Bill? Someone else told me Phil.
Never mind, l’ll get to meet him. You say Bill. l haven’t seen any posters.
l’ve never heard of the bloke. – You set up the drums.
– Two drum sets like that one. So this Bill, or Phil,
is he a good drummer, then? – He’s quite good, yeah.
– ls he? – ls he a young fellow or…
– Yeah, he’s quite young. l’m not sure of his age, but… l’ve never come across him, myself.
l don’t get out much. But you say he’s quite good,
so l may stick around for the show. – Yeah, it’s a good show.
– ls it? Now, this is dangerous. Right here. This is dangerous, having a ladder. l’ll make a note.
”Ladder dangling dangerously.” – So your name?
– David. Rule. – R…
– U… – U.
– L-E. – Your job?
– Looking after these instruments. – Basically…
– Guitars. And the individuals that play them,
which is quite a task. – ls it? How many are there?
– Two of them. You gotta keep an eye on them.
Never know what they’ll get up to. Do you get treated fairly?
ls he a good boss, this Bill? – Bill?
– Bill Collins. – Bill Collins tour?
– l was told it was, but l don’t know. l thought it was Kenny Rogers. – Would you mind telling me your name?
– Alain. – And you’re…?
– Swiss. Another non-English person.
Your last name? Schneebeli. Good luck. – Your job?
– Monitor. Monitor. All the musicians
wear these in-ear things, like this. – Do they ever go wrong?
– lt’s good. – They never break?
– No. Sometimes, yes. – What happens then?
– We change. Spare parts. – lt says Phil there.
– This is Phil. l guess his name is Phil.
l keep hearing Bill. Maybe he’s the bus driver. l’m afraid you’ll have to move this.
No walkway. lf somebody walked through,
they’d have an accident. Just take it as a bit of advice. – Thank you. Bye.
– Bye-bye. My word. Such a lot of work. l’m making a dossier
on people working for Bill Collins. – For who?
– Bill Collins. lt’s Phil Collins. l keep being told different things.
lt’s disturbing. l don’t know who’s lying to me.
Your name, sir? – Danny Gillen.
– And what would your job be? l’m an assistant to Bill Collins. An assistant. Don’t be funny with me. l’ll make life very awkward for you.
l’m beginning to think… Phil? l’m busy. l’ve heard he keeps people long hours. l think there may be
another complaint coming here. Long hours. Sanitation, because people don’t sleep in hotels,
they sleep on the buses. l’m seeing a grim story here. l’m on the other side of the coin. You travel with Mr Collins? – What kind of bus does he have?
– He’s got an aeroplane. – My word, that must be expensive.
– l don’t know. l don’t know where that’s come from.
l may have to evacuate the building. l may have to evacuate. lf that fell down, something else could fall down
and it’d be very dangerous. l’ve been told to investigate
some bad parking. That’s what l’m here for. But l found a piece of loose metal there
and l’m thinking, ”ls this all safe?” l’m told you are responsible
for getting it all up. – Absolutely.
– Name? Guilty as charged. Dave Rowe. – Dave Rowe.
– R-O-W-E. Your job is chief rigger.
Are there any more riggers? l have a number two with me,
Vince Rivnall. – Vince and…
– R-l-V… Just Vince? Just the two of you? – You do all that on your own.
– We have local help. – Are they reliable?
– Absolutely. We make sure they are. ls that a long job? This one’s taking approximately
four hours to put the show in. – Start before everybody else?
– First in, last out. Unless we find out,
l may have to evacuate the building. That’s one of my wheel stops. When l’m fixing the other three wheels,
that’s what l chock it up with. – Designer.
– l’m pleased to hear it. lt hasn’t come from above.
lt’s come from below. – l would’ve used my authority…
– You’re laden with authority. Seems to be getting worse all the time. – ls that Bill Collins?
– That’s Bill Collins. Standing up there? He’s a lot older… – We’re focusing on him as we speak.
– l might get to meet him, then. – Your name?
– Tellson James. – What is your job?
– l’m the lighting operator. – What do you do? lt looks complicated.
– lt’s very simple, really. We do a look for a verse of the song,
then another look… – Can you change it?
– And then all this happens. – lt all starts here?
– That’s what l do. – l have to put up the spotlights as well.
– Spotlights. Up there. – They shine on Mr Collins…
– He’s a bit of a big-head. – He likes it. But he’s a good man.
– ls he? – l’ve heard some mixed reports.
– Me too, but l always say no… You veer towards…
Give benefit of the doubt. – Your name?
– Stuart Heaney. Job? – l’m the video crew chief.
– You watch videos? We’ve got five manned cameras
and two unmanned… – You shoot the video?
– Onto side screens. So… l see, those screens.
ls that Bill Collins? – Yeah, that is.
– He’s younger. – Younger days.
– He sings live, does he? – Apparently so.
– There’s rumours? – Not that l’ve heard.
– OK, l’ll let you get on with your work. Very interesting talking to you.
Safe travels. lf you have any complaints,
l work for the council. Contact me. – Drive a truck?
– l don’t. – Or a bus?
– No, no, no… l’m investigating some bad parking. Trucks and buses. – You don’t drive?
– No, l don’t. …to investigate some very bad parking.
That wouldn’t be you? – Do you drive?
– Not on this tour. – But you have driven?
– Normally l’m a driver. Yeah, they’ve stuck me on keyboards. We’ve had some complaints
about parking, which l’m sure you’re not involved with. l don’t doubt it, but l’m not involved. Trucks and buses. – Do you have anything to do with it?
– Check the production office. l’ve been in there. ”Elvis.” This guy doesn’t know his name.
Bill Collins, Kenny Rogers, Elvis… – Hello?
– Yes… Hello. l’m Superintendent Strange. – l’m looking for Bill Collins or Elvis…
– He’s not available. – You need him for something?
– Who are you? – Tim Brockman.
– Your job? – l’m the tour manager.
– Now we’re getting somewhere. You’d be responsible, then,
for the trucks and buses? l suppose so. Problem with them? – Actually, no. Not really.
– OK. Perfect. – l’ll be on my way now.
– OK. lt’s a game of… Front and back. l wanted to imply in the title
that this was the last. ‘Cause it definitely puts a full stop
at the end of the sentence. Other nationalities which historically
don’t get English humour, get this, the joke about it being the first final. So, it’s kind of a reference to Cher and
people that come back again and again and do a first final farewell reunion tour. So, it’s meant to be funny, but
the bottom line is that it is the final tour. l started talking to Tony, my manager,
Smith, about what to do. Could we do a tour of maybe the places
we’ve only ever played once? l said, ”lf you do a month of shows,
l’ll do it.” l thought, ”That’s not gonna work.” l know the kind of show he’ll want to do.
The economics won’t work. ”No, listen to me now, a month… ”Yes, and a month in America…”
l said, ”No.” Of course, we’re doing a month
in Europe and a month in America. lt’s moved from theatres
to 50,000-seat stadiums. That’s a management trick, really. lt’s a five-week month. You give him a month and it’s,
”This month’s got five weeks, right?” They always take more, you know.
Give them an inch. My premise was just to take
all the songs that l felt l should play. l got out my albums and… …looked at the back covers
and wrote down the hits, the songs that were important. Bonsoir, Paris. On Face Value there was
”ln the Air Tonight”. On Hello l Must be Going there was
”You Can’t Hurry Love”. l went through the big tunes first
and then went back to check. l can’t sing for more than 2 1/2 hours
a night. You’re governed by that. l wanted to start on the drums
and l wanted to finish on the drums. l scanned the albums and chose the
ones l knew people would want to hear, that l was quite happy to sing, and take some back
to the original versions. ”Against All Odds”
is more the way it was. ”One More Night” is back
to the way it used to be. Lots of things have reverted
to their original state and some we’ve played around with. ”Come With Me” is about my son, although the melody was written
when Lily was born. lt really is a kids’ song. l had an idea to take the two hands
from the doodle l did on the album and move them together slowly
so at the end of the song they touch. And it just works. At the end of that song
every night l go, ”OK, that worked”. This band comes back
more from the 1990 tour, with Leland Sklar on bass
and Chester back on drums again. So this is going back over a decade.
lt feels nice. Sort of a retro-group again. This is an amazing band. Even the other things we’ve done,
the much shorter things, promoting his album and Brother Bear
and Tarzan and all of that, it’s only taken a few days’ rehearsal
to get things dialled in quickly. lt’s a special group of people. lt’s a gift that every once in a while
you get handed, a show like this, a group like this. You get to do what you enjoy doing
at its peak performance. Because the whole crew,
the lighting people, the sound people, are all as good as there is. lt raises the bar for everybody,
makes you work that much better. ln the old days, bands really formed
from friendships. Three guys, and, if your other friend
didn’t play an instrument, he played the bass. ”You don’t play anything?
Well, you play bass.” They were groups of friends
and then from then it developed. When l met him l had long blond hair,
great record collection, groovy chat. l’ve lost all that now. He hasn’t changed at all, l don’t think. He’s the same Phil as l knew
when we were kids. Just with a bit more money, l suppose. l met him in ’96 for the first time,
with the Big Band. l play with a lot of different acts
and when you work with Phil, he’s not just a singer,
he’s also a musician. Luis Conte is clearly one of the greatest
percussionists in the world. Leland has been a legend
for 30-odd years, as a bass player. Daryl has been with Phil,
and Genesis, since 1978. Chester played with Frank Zappa,
played with Weather Report. l’m in very, very select company here. Arnold’s not here. He had an accident
on the first day and tore his ligaments. He’s in LA having an operation. Hopefully he’ll be with us at some point,
but he’s out for now. That was the first day of rehearsal. To
find out he’s gotta fly home for surgery. When l went up the stairs for
”Wear my Hat”, to do the bit with Arnold, l thought, ”ls he gonna follow me? ”l hope he does, to rehearse the bit.
But l hope he’s careful. ” l’m thinking all this while l’m singing.
l went down the stairs, slowly. l ran across the stage. He ran after me.
Then his leg gave out. l can’t even imagine how depressed
he was when the reality set in. That he didn’t just hurt himself and
was gonna go put some ice on his leg. That this was actually a terrible injury
that would require major surgery. l’ve known Arnold now
for close to 30 years. l feel so bad for him,
’cause he lives for this. He was crying. lt was very sad. He couldn’t wait to do this tour
’cause it’s the last one. He’s been with me since ’89, ’90. Suddenly that’s all taken away from him.
So it was very sad. l miss him, but he’ll be back. l’m gonna put his face
on a milk carton in front of his mike, saying, ”Missing. lf found, please return
to Neuchatel.” He’ll be back. l’ve attracted an awful lot
of nice people in the crew that would do anything for you,
and also in the band. l’ve always been lucky with that, but this is a great assembly of people,
on and off stage. We try and take the same guys out
every time if they’re available. For the last three tours
we’ve pretty much had the same crew. lt’s a family. lt’s not a great big family
but it is a family. Steve Jones, you’ve met. Howard. Even people that don’t get on the tour, perhaps they’re doing another tour,
they stay in touch. Right, class. What are your thoughts so far? Stop playing with yourself, Thompson! We’ll pick up the specifics.
lf we get time to do the set, great. One more time. We did a 2 1/2 hour vocal rehearsal today,
which we’ve never ever done before. That was good,
and something we should do more often. When everybody’s on it,
that stuff makes goosebumps stand up. l want people’s arms
full of goosebumps at the end. l’m a lot tireder
than l was when we started. l’m amazed at how much else
there is to do, other than just the singing. Just the actual doing
what l’m supposed to be doing. That’s just a small part of this. Just doing the programme has been
something that’s been time-consuming. Some people probably just say,
”l don’t care what they sell. ”Just sell it. l’ll have the money. ”
l like to think the stuff is quality. You’ve got to look at it,
approve it, change it. The programme is very personal. This one’s a retrospective,
lots of old pictures from my personal archive
that l’ve kept over the years. Then sitting down with the lighting
designer and the lighting operator, going over what they’ve done, what they
could do and what you’d like to have. Sound, we had to do the same thing.
We stayed late to listen to the CD. Go back to what we’ve recorded and
make sure it’s finished and tweaked. lt would happen right before
we go into the bridge and right before the sax solo,
as a lead-in. We’d been rehearsing for four days
without the singers or horns. Just getting the basic songs ready. Then the singers came in. We had
a vocal rehearsal, which you’ve seen. And that took it to another level. But when the horns came in, all
the bits you felt like vamping, space, the reason there was space was the
horns, so they made a big difference. They miss us for two weeks
and then we walk in. ”Where were you guys?” We love that.
Come in quietly, kind of thing. This is like the bear pit. Down there is my drum kit
for ”ln the Air Tonight”, which spectacularly, hopefully, rises on this riser, comes up to here,
for ”ln the Air Tonight”. Anyway, we hope it’s gonna work,
because l did a show in Ghent on the last tour, in ’97. The drum kit was supposed to come up
in the middle of the stage and it didn’t. l walked around the stage.
We did the whole tune. When it came to ”Dada ‘n dada ‘n dada”, there was a big hole
with my drum kit right at the bottom. l didn’t really know what to do,
so l jumped. l played the whole thing in this hole. Hopefully that won’t happen.
lt’s a bit farther to jump this time. We always take the families on the road. But l’ve never taken my dog before. Jack. Someone’s gonna have to walk him
early in the morning. l’m not. And last thing at night. l’m not. l’m thinking of getting him onstage
for ”Wear my Hat”. l thought of having a dog running around
amongst us running around. He’s pretty good. l might be able
to get him with a hat as well. lf that happens,
even for a couple of minutes, people will say,
”That was a dog, wasn’t it?” Finishing touches.
Mad dogs and Englishmen. Now we need an audience. l don’t think we’re gonna get
much better without an audience. There comes a point where, with guys like this, fantastic musicians,
they just want to play now. And it takes an audience
to lift you to the next levels. OK. No more rehearsing. – lt’s raining but we’re still gonna play.
– Bloody wet out there. Look at the sky and tell me
if l’m looking forward to the first show. There’s a certain camaraderie
when it rains. People tend to rally together
and brave the elements. You get a different atmosphere.
lt’d be nice if it was sunny. l can’t hide the fact that l’m pissed off.
lt could be worse. We’ve got our health, haven’t we? You’ve got a lot of people up there, and
if everybody wore what they fancied, then it would look a bit of a mess. So we have Eileen and Martha.
Eileen’s been with us before. They have an unenviable task
of cleaning everything. A 1 6-piece band.
They clean everything each night. Plus the crew throw their laundry in,
as well. So it’s really mum to 40 people. lt’s a lot of work.
We start 7.30, 8 in the morning. We finish about 2 in the morning. The hardest part is coordinating
everything so everybody’s happy. This person wants to wear this,
this person wants to wear this… We can’t have them go on.
The guys are good. When we get to the ladies, that’s difficult. What l wear has got to be light. l can’t be sitting there,
trousers sticking to you. So they brought a selection out and l said, ”No. Yes! That feels great.” He wears comfortable T-shirts
underneath that look very plain. People say, ”All he wears is T-shirts”. His T-shirts are, like, £200 T-shirts. They’re all designer, Armani.
Good quality and they last. You need something that lasts
because they’re cleaned every night. They wear them once and
they’re cleaned, so they have to last. l’m wearing things l’d wear out
on the street. That’s my attitude to it. l don’t dress up. l dress down. – Tired?
– Yeah, l am today. l don’t know why. Here we are on our luxurious private jet, which does, actually, make it easier. l dread to think what it would be like
to travel with this many people at a real airport with a scheduled aircraft. ‘Cause ever since 9/11 ,
security’s been incredibly tight. You’d have to get to the airport
three hours early. Bags would be lost all over the world. So this is the only way. That’s my son.
The only real way to do it. We’ve just left Zurich,
where we played last night. We had about 44,000 people there,
which was fantastic. Apparently, Paul McCartney
didn’t get that many. lt was a great gig. Football stadium. Tonight is the first back-to-back show
we’ve had. Tonight we’re playing in Munich,
in the Olympic stadium, which is about 47,000 people. That, too, is sold out, fortunately.
These places are depressing if not. When we discussed the tour
and where to play, Phil and Tony wanted to make it
an intimate arena tour. But it became blindingly apparent that
when we put tickets on sale in Germany, the demand was ten times
the capacity we had. l’ve never had an artist upgrade overnight
to such big venues through demand. lt’s a brilliant tour because of that. Paris has always been great. Going back to Genesis days,
it’s always been a special town. The French population adopted Genesis years before we were strong in England,
never mind anywhere else. l think there is a special relationship.
They’re a fantastic audience. Look at those people. He is a complete musician. Each time he comes in Paris, l go to see
to his show, and l enjoy it each time. The Paris audience always
is just fantastic. And we actually delivered.
We played very well tonight. We did very well. l’m very pleased. Kevin, just give me a mark on that.
l just want to see how close… ls that too close? l’m trying to forget about it
and it’s ramming it down my throat. OK. l’ll tell you what. l’ll try
and work it further away at the front. l’ll try and minimise those and try
and get them slightly higher. One tends to, and we used to,
put tripwires in front of directors, saying, ”You can’t have a camera
any closer than here. No more light. ”This is the show we’ve designed.”
This goes back 30 years with Genesis. ”lf you can shoot it just the way we are, ”but yet, when the DVD is finished,
we love it.” Totally unrealistic parameters. Although on the box it says, ”Hamish
Hamilton, director”, that’s a misnomer. lt should be ”translator”, really. What l do is, l go into shows and l translate, in this case,
Phil’s show to television. We’ve been very lucky
with the last two DVDs. The Seriously Live in Berlin
was done the week the wall came down. Berlin was happiness itself. Then the last one, which we did in Paris,
towards the end of the tour, it caught a great show. l think they’ve done it
this time round as well. Hamish came to look at the show,
near the end of rehearsals. l’d just done a DVD for Peter Gabriel. lt turned out he’d been working with
Peter, and Madonna, all these people. l hadn’t thought about that.
We went on stage and played. l was thinking,
”He’s gonna be bored stiff.” There’s another slow song here.
We’re gonna have to change this. Straightaway it was insecurities. l met him in the toilet afterwards.
We’d finished rehearsing. l went up to him and said,
”Hi, l’m Hamish.” ln the gents toilets. He said, ”That was great.” l said, ”Yeah.”
Opening up the conversation. ”We gotta get the pacing a bit better.
Maybe it’s a bit slow.” He said… ”Absolutely not, you know. ”The set is like the soundtrack
to your life. ”lt goes back X number of years.
They’re all absolute hits.” l came out thinking, ”l’ve convinced him.” So it was a big moment, actually. ‘Cause you do go through those things
where you think, ”ls this slow?
ls anybody else bored here?” Actually, last night was the first time
that l can remember that l wasn’t nervous
about having a camera there. The audience was so great, l knew
it would kind of sap all the attention. l told the band to forget the cameras. lf we get it, we get it. The audience
is the most important thing. l was promised.
l know what these cameramen are like. No, l said before the show that l didn’t want the Steadicam
on the stage. lt’s a cumbersome thing. l was told that it wouldn’t be onstage. lt would be behind the backing singers, which l accepted,
because it’s out of the way. But l did turn around to see a shape
disappearing down the stairs quickly on one of the tunes, maybe early on,
like ”Billy” or something. Then l really saw it on ”Sussudio”
when they were getting in the way. At that point l lost it. ”What?” ln the jigsaw of shots that we got, l needed that shot, l know,
and l got it five or six times. l didn’t think l’d overstepped the mark. l hope he doesn’t kill me. He might be
much more upset than l thought he was. You know the shot’s gonna be good
and you just hope it won’t get in the way. Just that one little moment tonight
could have been dangerous. But, actually, it’s cool. l was angry at the time, very angry.
Not with him, with the cameraman. l didn’t know it was your fault. Anyway, we’re all going out tomorrow
night and we’ll see where it goes, really. You all make me so happy. He’s our leader. Probably about three and a half weeks
from the accident now. And he’s back. He can’t run around,
but he can move, and he can sing. lt was more emotional leaving.
l was excited to be back. The hardest part was
walking away from the job. The easy part was coming back
and being greeted by everyone. lmpressions of success
when l was 1 4, 1 5, was just, if l could make a living playing drums,
wouldn’t that be great? Phil’s ended up selling
80, 90 million records as a solo artist. lf you include Genesis and Brand X,
and all the producer stuff, and other records
that he’s been involved with, you’re probably looking at
300 million records that he appears on
in some form or other. l’m kind of shooting myself in the foot
by saying l’m not doing any more. Apart from the Big Band
and the odd showcase thing, l won’t. Nicholas is three. He’s gonna be starting school
in September 2006. l made a promise to myself
that, at that point, l would be there to do the things l wasn’t
able to do with my other children. With Lily, to some extent, l did, actually. But, nevertheless, not as much
as l would have wished. Simon and Jodie l wasn’t there for.
They moved to Canada. l just figured anything l do has got to
have a cut-off time of September 2006. l didn’t intend to make a speech
at the end of the show each night. But l do get to say thanks to the fans
that have been so loyal, all through the Genesis years. They’re the same people.
Obviously, different generations. So it’s turning out that each night
is kind of an emotional experience. l don’t come off sobbing, but it feels like
there’s a reason for doing it. From my point of view,
it was the right decision to come out and say goodbye properly. At one point l thought, ”That’s it. ”They’ve had their last tour.
Shame, but there you go.” l’m glad l did it ’cause every night
is a little bit of a thank you, turn the page. Au revoir, gotta go home.

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