Pine Valley Engine Shed by Carolina Craftsman Kits Episode 2-roofs and realistic detail parts

Pine Valley Engine Shed by Carolina Craftsman Kits Episode 2-roofs and realistic detail parts


if you ever wanted to try and build across from Quito was all to Hut in this video series I’ll show you how to build the Pine Valley engine shed for Carolina Craftsman tips by Jeff Grove I’ll step you through building this great medium-sized kit and show you some basic techniques that will achieve some awesome results hi I’m dan from model railroad techniques our YouTube channel producers how to and product review videos for the modeler no matter your skill level if you follow these steps in this video I’ll help you build this awesome craftsman kit the skills you will learn can be transferred across do anything you choose to build so let’s hit that subscribe click that little Bella icon to support us on patreon like us on Facebook and Instagram at Mile Road then the last video I left you with a photo of the the model on the layout and I had put all the windows in so what I’m gonna look at doing now is just quickly buzzing through how I wear the windows up so it’s very very simple process I won’t lament over it too too long purely because I’ve done a few videos on it now and I’ll link them to the cards now all I’m doing there is just grabbing some pastel chalks probably that would be the darker gray sorry the darker brown color and then just working I mean just just lightly going over and just taking some of that that luster away and sort of dulling down the colors of the it so also working to the top of the each of the window panes there cuz it’s overtime that’s where dust and grime is going to sit so with that obviously the antique white it’s quite a vivid color against that the oxide red but with the the weathering with the chalks and the like it really does tone it down and sort of meshes it in nicely to the rest of the model so at this point in time it’s just a matter of methodically working around your way around the model I should say to just go through all the windows all the panes less is more so you can always go back in at a later stage to tidy it up now we’re into making the corrugated iron roof so those portions there a scale 3 by 8 now what actually did with those that’s a new product that I’m trying which is a corrugated cardboard so it’s just a matter of colouring them up with under primer and then we’ll start doing the rust effects the colors are going to use for the rusting effect ah the raw umber which is the the darker brown color the bit number the raw Sienna a little Osteria by Americana and a golden oak or a yellow ocher type color now as mentioned I’m going to use a sponging technique so I don’t know how well that’s showing over that sponges got quite a small pores on it because these are quite delicate and roofing sheets so what I’m gonna do is I’m gonna start with the dark color first and then splud some of it out on your your plate so you can see I line up all my sheets quite methodically there I’m sort of torn between easy holding the sheets down with either some tweezers or you can see my finger there so I do apologize my hands in the way so it’s just a matter of working that color in or I’m a very very subtly on the bottom of each of those sheets and it’s just a gradation of the three or four colors were going to use to to get the desired result so the next colors I’m going in with is the burnt umber and the raw sienna both by Americana now you can sort of see that I’ve just randomly putting these colors on working towards the bottom of the sheet now I’m not too concerned whether I’ve done half the sheet a quarter or a sheet or just the tip of the sheet so obviously when you install them there will be a randomness to it how the colors will interact but trust me the the technique is quite quite effective if you want to mix the technique up a little bit what you can actually do you can have the rust on doing this more what I’m going to call more entrenched rust so it’s obviously been around for longer so the the light of the tone the new are the rust so if you want to more betray that you just need to put more all those times at the last color I’ll going with is the yellow ochre and I’ve just sparingly put this on and Dad so the next part of this little technique you can see I’ve got a 6b pencil there so what I do I just run around each of the four edges of each sheet the reason I do that is because being it’s a card based or paper-based product they’re all white so that just takes away back to that whiteness so what I also do I’m so run very very lightly pencil over there the high reaches of the sheets or what that actually emulates is a sheet that might be sort of more wear and tear on up there where some of the the color has started just to bleed through a little bit and just shows a more rustic type look so the next step I’m going to show you is how I install corrugated iron sheeting now you can see they’re a little outbuilding there to the side of the model is where this is going to go so that little sheet bear is just a very simple card stock that I’m sort of colored gray with the rattle-can I’ve done a few corrugated iron roofs now in various materials now what I’m sort of finding is that the first row of sheeting is paramount to get nice and square to make the overall roof look believable so I’m just well i’m find is I’m just adding some double-sided tape or transfer tape I think you call it in some parts of the world so just I so just so that first layer of the corrugated on I can put down nice and straight and true so here’s me adding the first very first sheet so obviously you work from the bottom up and being on right-hand at all start from the left so if you want to work from the right that’s fine that’s just it’s just the way I do it so what actually do is just a matter of overlapping each of the sheets by few of the the corrugated and I’m what I call the flutes or the ridge of the highs and the lows and just slowly work your way across the roof that’s probably point to point out that you just got to make sure when you do their first few sheets to get them nice and square with the edge of that the cardstock that’s underneath the roof so you basically want to have them ensure that the 90-degree angle on the left side there is nice and true so what I’m doing there some some of the sheets you you may need to add just a little bit of glue to make sure that the the sheets are not rising up now for the second layer of the sheeting so the first thing I put some of my aleene’s glue down super tacky and that’s just a matter of doing the same technique so it probably could argue that I’ve probably added just a little bit too much color or rusting to those sheets for the rest of the build but that’s fine I can add some more pastel chalks later on so it’s just a matter of moving your way across make sure you as you can see I’m sort of clamping that that one down because you want to make sure that it’s nice nice and flat before going on to the the next line of machining so that’s what the shading looks like at this point in time you can see so on the far right there those are hang a little bit such as the matter of gone three with the sharp pair of scissors or a knife and just cutting the back and squaring off so that’s no issues now when I step you through that the main roof of the shed so I’m sort of stepping out here a little bit so the look I want to get is a look of a tarpaper roof that has reasonable wear and tear and damage to us or what I mean by that the tar paper has all but eroded away and it’s showing the the joists and the bearers and the formwork underneath so there’s an example of the first lot of Deeds that’s actually clapboard or sorry board and batten siding underneath with some strip board over the top of it so I’m not totally happy with that that system purely because there’s too much of a profile between the weather board and batten starts and the roof the top of the tar paper area finishes I just don’t think that’s quite prototypical from a distance it looks fine so it’s going to be on that the side of the shed that is very really going to be seen so I’ve come up with a better way of doing that so I’ll show you how I’ve done that so this is the look I’m after so you can see that I’ve cut into the corner of the under cardboard cardstock I’ve added some support there then I’ve started going through and added some some strip the strip would serve at 1/16 an inch it’s already pre stained so I will have to go back in and do some more coloring it with pastel chalks and maybe some stains but probably the video doesn’t give it justice it’s actually quite nice looking stained already on it so the first step of making the roof the way that I want to do it is cutting into the card stock there the shape that you’re after into the roof so you can see you just do that with an exacto knife now then the next thing I’m doing there is just gluing to the underside of the roof card is just there to simple coffee stirrers now just be mindful a mistake that I did make is just try to keep it away from any of the edges because it will interfere when you glue the roof on to the actual building proper so I probably went with four at that point in time so that’s what it looks like from the other side now in that picture there you can see I’ve gone through and started coloring it up so I’ll just used a beer number and just colored that just coffee stairs just surf they’ll put any gaps within the roof purlins that that I that wood doesn’t show through so the next step is just gluing their strip board in place so all you do is you start from the bottom the top doesn’t really matter and cut them roughly to size so I did cut them just a little bit too long so I can go back and and trim them up later so when you get to either the top of the bottom edge there doesn’t really matter if there’s a slight gap because what you can actually do hide that edge with the tar paper when you go through and do that part of the technique so that’s the finished product so you can actually see that the the profile of that wood actually fits nice and snugly in there so the top of the strip board as I’m pointing out there is pretty well level with the top of the card so the thickness is just right so obviously saw the last roof which was less convincing but I’m quite happy with the way this is coming out so the next step is preparing all the strips so the strip’s I’ve done there is just a black construction paper and then up with a rattle can I have sprayed it lightly with a gray undercoat so I’m putting the cards above how I’ve done that before in previous builds but those strips are approximately a half an inch wide and the full length of an a4 piece of paper so there they are there so you can sort of see how it’s just not full great a gray color in there some of the black is coming through so the next thing I of trialed here is that’s a 400 grit piece of sandpaper so just to sort of guns the engine up and just to start weathering up those individual strips I’ll just pull it through my fingers like that and add a little bit of pressure more towards the edge of the sheet and it’s actually coming up quite nicely it sort of peeling some of the weight of that paint so the only issue with doing it this way it does curl it up a little bit so it’s just matter of pinning him in the opposite direction to get him back flat so you can sort of see there the look that I’m after so it’s just starting to wither up nicely and sort of decay with the weather and time and now what we’ll do we’ll install the sheet so you can see I’ve put a my first line of glue there so just a matter of grabbing one of the sheets now I normally find I put the most weathered edge towards the bottom of each individual strip that just seems to look nicer so here’s me just putting it through such just a matter of thanks you’re on you square it up to the edges nicely so what I’m sort of finding is it’s best to have a length of the strip and then actually cut the individual strip as you go around where the wooden planks are showing through the reason for that is if you don’t do that what will actually happen you actually have to tear up some of the strip to actually get to it so I haven’t done it there but was a mistake what I made and I’ve gone back in since and that’s how I’ve done it so after you get this other first strip down you can probably put enough glue down from maybe two lines of the sheeting so that’s the the outcome and the look I’m trying to get so you can sort of see that I’ve put a little bit of gap in the board there also to add a little bit more effect now the board’s over the top holding a tarpaper dam which is someone’s trying to patch up all I’ve done there is use the same type of strip wood as as the barge and other trimmings goofed it up with wire brush and put a over wash of isopropanol and Indian ink lights so it’s just a matter of sticking them on there and it’s sort of breaking the ends to make em a little more rustic looking so obviously that has not had the pastel chalks and all that go through it as yet as you can sort of see I’ve sort of gone in around the edge there with a with an exacto knife and just started picking away at the edges just to accentuate a little bit more wear and tear there but on whole and whole I’m actually quite happy the way this technique has come out so I’ve gone through and applied the roof there put the ridge cap on and also you can see that strip wood across the top there which is like a walking board so that is is some leftover stripper that I had same sort of technique it’s obviously it was what anti Dwight initially I scrubbed it back quite hard with a wire brush and then put a stain of isopropanol and black ink over the top of it so then it’s part of the build of a DS and the strip went to the front of the roof which I called the barge so it’s technically same sort of technique it’s the strip wood that’s painted antique white brush down with a wire brush and then Ian ain’t wash over top of it so Ivan sort of weathered that quite as much as the top because it probably get as much weathering so obviously you put that that both ends and over and around all the doors so the next part of the bill where I’ve built the foundation ears along here so basically what that is that’s a quarter of inch high grit card which comes with the kit so that is the card there it’s a lovely little product now so all you do you cut it you cut it to length so that the foundation or what it actually sits on is made out of some of this this wood here that I had lying around so this here is probably bit over an inch wide all I did was cut it down the middle and then I glued it to the underside of the of the building so don’t know if you can see it’s just a little instep there as a foundation wood so just be mindful when you do your supports underneath here it’s probably important that you ensure that one these are actually level and two there’s probably enough gap there because on a few of these I had to sort of be a little bit liberal and sort of cut it right down so then it’s just a matter of gluing or your card in and then just going all the way around for the foundation the other detail that I looked at putting on which also come for the kit is these little drums here so that’s just a matter of I just painted up we various shades or I painted them black to start with because they are actually a resin detail so with that I then color them up with various brown type color sober number raw Sienna Anoka color and sort of a car key type color and I sort of stupid on then I put an isopropanol wash on it then on the banding I don’t know if you can actually see that which would be the metal banding there I just used a 6b pencil and then I swing around and colored just so lightly and I sort of this brings out that detail quite nicely so there’s obviously that one there and that one so the next step is on the detail I then did the ladder so the ladder was plastic styrene so it’s just a matter of undercoated that with a gray primer and then same sort of technique I just came through with different types of Browns and then just sort of stippled the colors on there and then washed over the top of it and then stuck it on there so it looks quite quite suitable for what’s required of it now the next step obviously was also a styrene chimney so same sort of technique but I wanted to weather this up just a little bit more so under coated it with a gray primer as well and then what go first of all go to wash with black isopropanol any meaning and then I painted it a color called soft black by Americana so that’s it’s a real rule matte black it’s a lovely color so sort of really brown or black brown type color sponge brushed on the color sorry the resting and sort of just accentuated more around the all the scenes and all that so the rust colors I use with burnt umber raw sienna and an ochre color as well so then I sort of stuck that through so then I went through and just added a bit more pastel chalks sort of a real rusty type color just to accentuate because obviously with the rain falling on with a roof like this will just overtime would stain stay in the roof here so also I went through and just picked up some more of the detail and sort of the rust colors coming through with that so the other little piece of detail that comes with a kit are these little lights so that’s just a matter of constructing them and they’re also painted with that black now that soft black color so there’s a light there and a light there sorry the next point piece of detail I’ll point out is just these little these little stair wheels here or flights upstairs so they’re made with a piece of styrene which is quite delicate so that’s sort of what I have left of it so that’s obviously the the bearers and the stringer regarding the stairs so it’s just a matter cutting them to length coming at the right angle and then the actual treads on the stairs I went back through and used that strip wall down just a matter of sticking them to the side and when you sort of put them in for the right angle see them on the ground and so you can actually see that it sits beautifully on the bottom there so so this is the end of the build for the CCK or Carolina craft and kicked Pine Valley engine shed it’s been an awesome little build I’ve really really enjoyed building this and I think I’ve come up with a quite a reasonable product there so big shout out to Jeff Grove at C CK for making such an awesome little kit for me to build so that’s the end of the video as I said so thank you very much for watching so my next videos I’m probably gonna look at building some boats and ships for a harbor scene that I’m currently in the process of buildings make sure you subscribe and comment and all that other good stuff so we’ll see you next time make sure you subscribe click that little Bella icon to be more videos support us on patreon like us on Facebook and Instagram at model 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