Products That Were Created By Accident

Products That Were Created By Accident


Here are products that were supposed to be
something else! 8 – Viagra
A group of scientists working at pharmaceutical giant Pfizer developed Sildenafil, or as the
world knows it better, the little magic blue pill called Viagra. Sildenafil was originally invented as a treatment
for hypertension, angina, and other symptoms of heart disease. However, clinical trials found that the compound
had almost no effect on the heart or angina, but quite an amazing side effect on the happiest
area of the male body. To explain it better, let’s just say that
the male test subjects were experiencing a rather unexpected side effect. Someone in the marketing department figured
out that that side effect would do much better as a main effect, and Viagra soon went on
sale across the globe. The drug was patented in 1996 and approved
for use by the FDA on March 27, 1998. It was offered for sale later that year. In 2008, Pfizer sold almost $2 BILLION dollars
worth of this little blue pill! That’s billions with a B!! The patent has now expired and now there are
plenty of drug companies that sell their own generic version. 7 – Bubble wrap
Two New Jersey engineers invented bubble wrap back in 1957 by sealing shower curtains together
and trapping air bubbles between them. Now, why in the world would they wanna do
that? Weirdly enough, they wanted to sell their
new invention as wallpaper. I’m gonna guess that it didn’t exactly
sell to too many housewives back then. After an unsuccessful attempt at wallpaper,
these guys thought up a marginally more successful attempt to offload it as greenhouse insulation. But it was when they thought to sell it to
IBM as a packing material for computers that things really took off for the appropriately-named
Sealed Air Corporation which owns the brand name of Bubble Wrap. According to Sealed Air company legend, it
wasn’t until IBM launched the 1401 computer in 1959 that Bubble Wrap was first used for
the purpose of keeping products safe in transit. The patent for the wrap expired many years
ago, so you’re as likely to find yourself idly popping “bubble pack”, “bubble paper”,
or “bubble wrapping” as you are finding Bubble Wrap these days. One of the best uses of bubble wrap apart
from being used to protect things in transit is……of course…..popping the bubbles
to release stress, anxiety, and tension. There are websites out there that provide
a virtual bubble wrap program which displays a sheet of bubble wrap that users can pop
by clicking on the bubbles. Interestingly enough, there’s even a Bubble
Wrap Appreciation Day which is celebrated every last Monday of January. 6 – Play-Doh
Who doesn’t like Play-Doh? The brightly colored clay that all of us grew
up molding and poking and very likely stuffing in our mouths when no one was watching, was
first invented in the 1930s! However, its inventor had a completely different
plan for the product. The non-toxic, non-staining, and reusable
modeling compound that came to be known as “Play-Doh” was concocted by Noah McVicker
of Cincinnati-based soap manufacturer Kutol Products. It was devised at the request of Kroger Grocery,
who wanted a product that could clean coal residue from wallpaper. Yeah, they used to clean wallpapers in the
past because they didn’t have internal heating so there was a lot of coal buildup on walls
around houses. However, with the transition from coal-based
home heating to natural gas and the resulting decrease in internal soot, as well as the
introduction of washable vinyl-based wallpaper, the market for wallpaper-cleaning putty decreased
substantially. So in order to save the company from bankruptcy,
McVicker’s nephew, Joe McVicker, joined the company. Joe McVicker was the brother-in-law of nursery
school teacher Kay Zufall, and Zufall had seen a newspaper article about making art
projects with the wallpaper-cleaning putty. Her students enjoyed it, and she persuaded
Bill Rhodenbaugh, a salesman who sold the putty, and McVicker to manufacture it as a
child’s toy. Zufall and her husband came up with the name
Play-Doh; Joe McVicker and Rhodenbaugh had wanted to call it “Rainbow Modeling Compound”. Who else is extremely happy that the name
Play-Doh won instead?! 5 – Slinky
Well, I guess some of the best selling things ever have been discovered by a complete accident! In 1943, Richard James, a naval mechanical
engineer stationed at the William Cramp and Sons shipyards in Philadelphia, was developing
springs that could support and stabilize sensitive instruments on ships in rough seas. Obviously this guy was working on a pretty
big work project here, and not on something kids would be begging their parents for for
Christmas. James accidentally knocked one of the springs
from a shelf and watched as the spring “stepped” in a series of arcs to a stack of books, and
to the floor, where it recoiled itself and stood upright. His wife Betty later said that James thought
he could make the thing walk if he quote “got the right property of steel and tension”. James experimented with different types of
steel wire over the next year and finally found a spring that would walk. His wife was skeptical at first but changed
her mind after the toy was fine-tuned and kids from the neighborhood went crazy about
it. She found the word Slinky in a dictionary
– it means something sleek and graceful, which basically was the perfect word that
aptly described the metal spring “walking” around on the floor. In 1946, Slinky was introduced at the American
Toy Fair and became a complete hit, with the first 400 units selling out in about ninety
minutes! In its first 60 years the Slinky has sold
300 million units and it’s still a toy out on the market today. 4 – Kleenex
Kleenex was the first Western facial tissue. Kleenex was introduced in 1924 and originally
marketed as a way to remove cold cream or makeup. It was a disposable substitute for face towels
or cotton wool, not for sticking our noses in it when we have to clear our noses. In 1925, the first Kleenex tissue ad was used
in magazines showing quote “the new secret of keeping a pretty skin as used by famous
movie stars…”. They did overdo it a bit, cuz I mean come
on, it’s just a paper tissue. A few years after the introduction of Kleenex,
the company’s head researcher tried to persuade the head of advertising to try to market the
tissue for colds and hay fever. The administrator declined the idea but then
committed a small amount of ad space to mention using Kleenex tissue as a handkerchief. By the 1930s, Kleenex was being marketed with
the slogan “Don’t Carry a Cold in Your Pocket” and the rest is history – its
use as a disposable handkerchief became the norm. 3 – Coca Cola Coca-Cola, one of the world’s most famous
brand names, was originally invented as a headache treatment and anxiety reliever. Now it’s the sidekick to Jack and Cokes
all over the world, and NO, PEPSI IS NOT OKAY!!! Coke was invented in the late 19th century
by John Pemberton. He first invented a sweet, alcoholic drink
infused with coca leaves for an extra kick. Yeah, I bet those coca leaves gave it an extra
kick. The first Coke was called Pemberton’s French
Wine Coca. The modern name of the drink refers to two
of its original ingredients, which were kola nuts, a source of caffeine and coca leaves. It would be another two decades before that
recipe was developed further on. Later on, the drink was bought out by businessman
Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coca-Cola to its dominance of the world
soft-drink market throughout the 20th century. As it grew as a brand, Coca-Cola was gradually
honed with carbonation and sweeteners to give the world its most famous soda. The current formula of Coca-Cola remains a
trade secret, although a variety of reported recipes and experimental recreations have
been published. 2 – Listerine
Listerine was invented in 1879, first as a surgical antiseptic. An article from 1888 recommends Listerine
for quote, “sweaty feet and soft corns developing between the toes.” Ugh. Over the course of the next century, it was
marketed as a cure for the common cold, as a dandruff treatment, and interesting enough,
as a refreshing additive to cigarettes. Combining minty freshness with smoking, Listerine
came out with their own line of cigarettes in 1927. Ironically, this was in the same era that
Listerine marketed its products as being able to prevent and alleviate sore throats and
colds. Can anyone come up with a better cure for
a sore throat rather than inhaling some cigarette smoke right?! Presumably, these cigarettes were similar
in effect to menthol cigarettes which were being developed and marketed at the same time
as “Spud Menthol Cool Cigarettes.” Viewing these two products as competitors,
it’s clear now which was the winner since no one smokes Listerines. 1 – 7 UP
7UP started out with a weird name – I doubt anyone would dig into a drink called “Bib-Label
Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda.” Get me a glass of Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime
Soda, could you please? Luckily, someone doing marketing for 7UP realized
that that name wasn’t the best idea ever so they went ahead and changed it. 7 Up was created by Charles Leiper Grigg,
who launched his St. Louis–based company The Howdy Corporation in 1920. Grigg came up with the formula for a lemon-lime
soft drink in 1929, and as the name implies, the lemon-lime flavored drink contained lithium
— a drug used in the psychiatric treatment of people suffering from bipolar disorder. The drink was launched two weeks before the
Wall Street Crash of 1929. I’m sure that didn’t help out sales! The drink contained lithium citrate, a mood-stabilizing
drug, all the way until 1948. It’s even suggested that the “7” in the
name refers to lithium’s atomic mass and “UP” could be to do with an improved mood. Here’s what’s next!

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