TBP Episode 07: Spackling

TBP Episode 07: Spackling


– Funding for the trade
best practice series is provided by the Benjamin
Moore and company foundation in partnership with Teach
Construction and through the generous support of
PDCA sponsors and members. (upbeat music) – So, we’ve prepped, we’ve
taped, we’ve mast, we’ve sanded, let’s talk about spackling. It’s not a word you
come across every day if you’re not a painter, spackle is a compound
used to fill in cracks in wood and plaster and to
create a smooth flat surface. So if you’re spackling,
you’re using spackle to fill in defects and create
a smooth surface. Get it? Okay, but you don’t use
spackle to fill in joints, that’s what caulk is for and
we’ll talk about that later. Now, all spackles
are not created equal so the appropriate spackle
for a particular situation is best learnt through
experience and job
site conditions. So first, where do you spackle? Holes from wall anchors
or picture hanging, small dense or gouges,
smoothing chipped edges. Kinds of spackle;
interior exteriors, yes there are both interior
and exterior spackle, interior will not
work on exteriors. Light-weight fillers, ideal
for plaster and drywall and softer material is
suited for light duty like picture holes. Patching compounds,
for re-profiling edges or filling large
dents and dings. It’s a harder material and
is suited for heavier use. Nail hole fillers, to
fill, yes, nail holes. Now there’s a whole range of
desirable spackle qualities: Dry time, faster is often
better, minimal to no shrinkage single application is the goal. Minimize flashing so a primer
coat may not be necessary to make the repair invisible. So, what is flashing? Flashing is the appearance of
inconsistency in the top coat caused by changes and underlying
processes or materials. Short version, Sometimes
after you paint, you can kind of tell if you
sanded here and not here, or if you applied spackle
here and not here. The solution, change up your
process and your materials, your company will
likely have selected among spackle materials that
strike the right balance between dry time and flash
resistance, shrink-ability, knife-ability, etc. Oh boy, now I’m geeking
out on this stuff. Hey, by the way,
don’t forget to clean the spackle off your putty
knife when you’re finished. It’s not only good
for your tools, but it’s kind of a safety thing. We’ve talked a lot
about the importance of keeping your tools
clean and organized because it not only contributes
to your efficiency at work, but it helps keep you safe. One slip of the putty knife and you’re heading
somewhere for stitches. The same goes for screwdrivers
and utility knives. So clean crud off your
tools at the end of the day. Your fingers and limbs
will thank you for it and they’ll be appreciative
for you taking them along on this adventure we call life. Okay, so fingers limbs,
putty knives, spackling, I think that’s it. So now for some in the field
training, to the field. (upbeat music) Whether done before or in
between sanding passes, once you start spackling
you know you’ve reached one of the final stages of prep. Being meticulous as you
fill in create the desired flat surface will prove
beneficial in the long run. First, scan the surface
carefully to identify anything that needs to be filled. This includes scratches, cracks,
screw pops and nail holes, just to name a few. Even in new construction,
you’ll find dings and dents that need to be speckled
in between coats. Don’t forget to fill
it in around doorframes and window sills. I see in this home that’s
only about 10 years old that you’re doing a lot of prep
on scratches and screw pops and indentations,
small little things, while other work for
such little things. – They are meticulous things
that not everybody would catch, which is a reason why we are
in the field that we’re in in the high end
painting industry. Working in these high end homes is because we catch those
little imperfections and things that normal
people may not see and that just makes our
job look that much better and sets us aside from
the rest of the companies. – What kind of imperfections
are we talking about? – [Daniel] old picture
hanger holes, the screw pops, the scratches, old fazzies
from old roller covers that were used in the
original paint job and of course, paint boogers. – What’s a paint booger paint? – Paint boogers are just dried
up paint that has gotten into the wet paint, usually
from rolling continuously into a bucket that dries
on the edge of the bucket and gets mixed in
with the wet paint. You’ll see that
transferred to the wall. So we want to make sure
that those are taken out. (upbeat music) – Trade best practices,
inspect wall. First, its best to
identify repair areas. Of course, you’ve read
the scope of work, so you’ll prep to
that standard, right. The scope might call
for spackling scratches
and nail holes, but not nail tops or deaths. Read the scope so
you don’t over prep. Putty knife,
(upbeat music) it’s best to use the smallest
tool that will do the job. This will minimize
the repair area. A two inch or four inch
putty knife is best for larger holes or cracks. A one inch putty knife
is great for small areas like nail holes. Spackling. Fill the defect then
wipe the area clean working in a quick x pattern. This will fill the
defects but not overfill which saves on sanding. A damp rag can be used to
wipe away excess spackle around the repair and
minimize the repair area. (upbeat music) – I was looking for a home
and SNL is the best company I’ve ever worked for. Here at SNL we’re
a technique group and it’s almost more like
a family than a company. – [Instructor]
Next up, caulking. Hey, by the way (laughs) to the field. I have to blink (upbeat music)

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