World Water Day 2016 Climate Justice Fund Water Futures Programme

World Water Day 2016 Climate Justice Fund Water Futures Programme


“It’s World Water Day 2016, the whole
world is thinking about Water today and of course here we are in Scotland, the
Hydro Nation surrounded by water everywhere. Therefore it’s hard for us to
understand that there are places in the world that people still do not have a
daily access to water. We very much welcome the opportunity to work through
the Scottish Government’s Hydro Nation Waters Futures Programme with the
Government to Malawi; with NGOs in Malawi; with universities in Malawi, to try to
find a way to make sure that everyone there by 2030 at the end of the
Sustainable Development Goals actually has access to water. We very much then
welcome this opportunity and look forward to working closely with the
Malawi Government and others in Malawi. Thank you.” “We’re here in Chikwawa at
some of the older boreholes that have actually been drilled in the more
popular areas that are closer to the city and closer to the East bank. Essentially what you see behind me is a unimproved borehole and the idea behind
the Climate Justice Project was to try to take the previous way that people
were putting this infrastructure in and come up with a much more sustainable way. But first most important aspect of the Climate Justice Project was to map every
single one of the boreholes like the ones you see behind me and by
understanding where all the boreholes were, we can better understand where
there was a need across Chikwawa in this district. If you look far into the
distance behind this borehole approximately 100 metres away is another
borehole that’s very close to this one. This one was actually drilled for the
church that’s right behind us and the other one was drilled for the community
that it was there. All too often what happened is the implementation of
boreholes like this was not about where the need was, it was about where a
specific donor or a specific project was actually working in this case right near
a church.” “This borehole was installed by UK charity in 1993. It lasted less than
10 years because they did not put that borehole in properly
because they don’t look at the hydrogeology. What we now have is this
community walking down to this unprotected water supply over here to my
right.” “We’ve been very fortunate for the last five years to work in the water
scarce regions of Southern Malawi. There we’ve been working with our strategic
partner Water For People and with the Government of Malawi to try to
understand and map all the water resources and which ones are functioning
in which ones aren’t functioning. This has been able to allow us to understand
an investment need; with the investment need to start thinking of ways of
actually gaining capital resource; concurrent capital resource that can
keep these water supplies going and actually make a long-term sustainable
rural water resource.” “This is something that if replicated across the country that if replicated across the country, it
will have far-reaching results. It just requires commitment, close monitoring. Everything else should go and every day we should always be learning lessons
because there’s always lessons learned in everything that we do. So looking at
what we have achieved so far I think if replicated, we have far-reaching results
in the country.” “One of the new opportunities with this Scottish
Government: Hydro Nation Water Futures Programme project that we’re starting in
Malawi, is to actually build capacity and this is not just capacity for people
here in Scotland or for people in Malawi but a shared capacity. They’ll be shared
learning back and forth between the two countries on water resources.” “The CJF
project in Chikwawa has tried to get more information that can be used in the
planning of activities in groundwater that maybe not a district so at a
national level or the regional level because when you plan you need all
the information that you can get and very valuable information that can be
used and the CJF project has tried to do that where we have the databases we have
studies that have been done by Strathclyde University where they go beyond
understanding groundwater. So I think that information is very important and
also important in the enforcement of the acts that have been passed.” “So the Climate Justice Project was looking at climate resilience, looking at the water
resources and making sure that communities have a sustainable water
supply here in Chikwawa. We just saw a borehole that was drilled in 1993
and because it was not drilled by a hydrogeologist and was drilled
incorrectly, that community is now dependent upon this water supply for its
daily water use. There we haven’t had the opportunity to actually get a Climate
Justice or other investment in the into this community at this point because in
the past somebody had already invested in a water supply that failed. They
failed because it was saline, it failed because the groundwater installation the
Aquifer itself that was a saline wasn’t kept away from the freshwater and
therefore, the idea of putting another borehole in here is suspect because
people think the groundwater here is saline. So what are people left to actually
use on a day-by-day basis is an open unprotected water resource like this
which has huge potential for waterborne disease, cholera and other epidemics as
well. So when we look at the learning that we’ve come from on the Climate
Justice Project, it’s not just about knowledge in groundwater it’s not just
about trying to understand water resources on a big scale or from a
political point of view, it’s actually trying to make sure that the next
generation the Sustainable Development Goals generation of people are actually
putting in water resources in a way that people are no longer going to be depend
upon water supplies like this.” “This understanding therefore from the
last five years has allowed us to expand this interest in seven more districts
into Southern Malawi and the new funding from the Scottish Government under the
Water Futures Programme will expand and apply the work that we’re doing in just
one district to seven other districts. With this, we can look at the potential then
for investment strategies that can meet the Sustainable Development Goals.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *